Moulding and Trim

Come share your ideas for sprucing up your property.

Moderators: Greg, Mark, mhrAJ333, JD

Locked
crackur
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:03 pm

Thu Jan 07, 2010 3:31 pm

I'm going to be doing some moulding and trim work in my bedrooms to begin with and I had a cple of questions.

I was at lowes and notice some of the trim come in 14ft and I measured the doors and they are about 7ft. I was wondering would it be a good idea to buy the 14 ft and cut it into and miter the angles after that?

Or would it be better to do something else with that>?

Also, my rooms are 11somethingx12something and then the master 13somethingx14something

the crown I'm looking at is 12ft I believe.....what is the best of cutting this for the excessive inches and extra foot in the room's walls that is longer than 12>?

Also, its cool to take the batten strips along the bottom and top to install the base and crown right? or can you do it over the bottom? etc?

any information that can help is greatly appreciated.


User avatar
Greg
Moderator
Posts: 5673
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY
Contact:

Thu Jan 07, 2010 6:02 pm

I buy either 7' or 8' lengths, I think if you check the price it is cheaper plus easier to work with.

Crown Molding, I hope you have lots of hair because I guarantee that you will be pulling it out.
http://www.installcrown.com/
This site may help, Remember that when you make your cuts that the crown molding does not sit flat against the wall like it does in the saw.

One other thing you may want to think about is a Miter saw protractor, Starret makes one that is great
http://www.starrett.com/pages/1117_505_ ... actors.cfm
Your walls are NOT a true 90* angle and the molding will show it if you cut as if it is.

For the bottom I would just use either 1/4 round or you can make molding out of 1x4 with a router.

Remember, measure twice, cut once (a little long) and I always use scraps for "test" cuts in the corners. Greg
Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

crackur
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:03 pm

Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:06 pm

that protractor is pretty neat but expensive and I don't really need to add any more expenses to my budget

ie trim, moulding, base, and a cp miter saw.

I do appreciate the help, oh geez I hope I'm able to get the inside corners right and the angles on the door

User avatar
Greg
Moderator
Posts: 5673
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY
Contact:

Thu Jan 07, 2010 8:17 pm

Before you buy a NEW saw, check around for a good used saw. I have found lots of good deals out there, more saw for the same or less money. Craigs list, Ebay etc, Even Home Depot may have a "Reman" unit, usually used once & brought back, I bought a 12" rigid for half price.

You can also use a sliding "T" square in place of the protractor. It's a little slower, but just as accurate. http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=p ... lpage=none

Angles for the door molding are a simple 45*, as long as the length is right it will fit. That is why I said cut a little long, it is easier to cut a blade width off than add it on. Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

crackur
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:03 pm

Fri Jan 08, 2010 10:06 am

thanks man, I really appreciate it! I'm sure my wife will too, she won't have to leave all the time I'm yelling about doing something wrong LOL


crackur
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:03 pm

Fri Jan 08, 2010 10:25 am

what brand of compound miters do you suggest ? also, if I'm only doing the crown and trim work how is buying a factory reconditioned or refurbished saw? on ebay


I took your suggestion and looked more over and I'm going to try to save some money since I just have some car trouble that depleted my cash.


I do greatly appreciate your help with this.

This site has helped me along my future of working on my house

User avatar
Greg
Moderator
Posts: 5673
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY
Contact:

Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:46 am

I don't want to confuse you even more but... What I did was go the the big box stores and "play" with the saws, er I mean do research ya thats it. You have saws set up side by side you can compare the feel of them, the difference in just the handles is a lot, plus the way the tables swing & lock. Once you "do some research" you can narrow down the list of saws.

If all you are going to do is molding you don't need a big saw, but I would bet that sooner or later you WILL do some framing and that is where a 10 or 12" saw comes in, so keep that in mind. Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

User avatar
Jim from Canada
Posts: 551
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 10:39 am
Location: Seaforth, ON

Sat Jan 09, 2010 9:11 am

If you have a router and table saw, you can make up your own moldings from flatstock for about 1/4 the price of buying it.
Remember, minimum code requirement is just that....MINIMUM

User avatar
Yanita
Moderator
Posts: 3369
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2007 10:16 pm
Location: Eastern N. Carolina

Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:26 am

That's what we have done pretty much through out the house, made our own. As for the batten strips Hubby uses a chisel (sharp one) and cuts off the section of batten, then installs the crown and base moulding.

Good luck, I advise buying some extra sticks of crown just to learn how to cut crown. There are also "stopping blocks", at least that is what I call them. They are decorative pieces that you can install in the corners of your room and the crown butts right up to them nice and snug. Gives a nice finish as well. They come in both inside and outside corners.

PS, check your local pawn shops for saws as well.

Yanita
The difference between success and failure is who gives up first!

crackur
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:03 pm

Sat Jan 09, 2010 1:31 pm

chiseling? I don't see me chiseling that much ever LOL

the block thing I am looking at.

I live in the boonies........ain't no one pawning a miter saw lol ..........maybe guns or jewelry

User avatar
Yanita
Moderator
Posts: 3369
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2007 10:16 pm
Location: Eastern N. Carolina

Thu Jan 14, 2010 4:37 pm

He uses the chisel to cut the batten while it is still in place. That way you do not have to remove the batten, risk breaking it and then reinstalling.

Yanita
The difference between success and failure is who gives up first!

crackur
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:03 pm

Thu Jan 28, 2010 3:51 pm

Ok I got a Compound Miter Saw for my bday. I know, Happy Bday haha

I'm looking at getting 2 packs of crown in the contractor packs........... thats 8 pieces of 12'

Meaning I will have 16 pieces of 12'
I have 12 walls I am going to do first.

I have 4 walls that are under 12, they are 10 something.
I have 4 walls that are around 12 1/2

the other 4 walls are 13 something and 14 something.

I'm thinking 4 of the walls can be done with the 12' with cuts made on the whole piece

while the other 8 walls will need additional length
So I will have 12 pieces of 12' moulding and 8 walls (4 of 12 1/2 ft and the other larger room)
So should this work out after some practice on a cple spare pieces of moulding I buy on the side?

User avatar
Greg
Moderator
Posts: 5673
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY
Contact:

Thu Jan 28, 2010 6:25 pm

GO FOR IT!!!! Like I said,Measure twice cut a little long, it's easier to take a blade width off than put it back on!! Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

Locked