Window Sills Peeling

Repair help for the do-it-yourselfer.
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Lenora_D
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 11:26 am

Mon Feb 21, 2011 6:05 pm

We live in a 1994 Skyline double-wide. The windows have particle board sills with white plastic attached. They are all peeling, and some of the bottom sills have damage from sweaty windows. I know I need to replace those damaged bottom sills. I am thinking of removing the rest of the peeling plastic covering and painting the sills that are not damaged. I would use exterior grade paint. My questions are:
1. Is it a good idea to paint over the stripped particle board sills, and is it even worth it with a stickiness still present from the glued laminate (or whatever you call that white peeling plastic)?

2. While I'm walking by here, is there something I could do to reduce the sweating of the windows? As you probably know, the sweating occurs in cold weather.

Thank you!


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Greg
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Mon Feb 21, 2011 8:50 pm

It sounds to me like you have the basic "Trailer" windows, two single pane windows with the wall space between them. If this is the case I can tell you you are fighting a battle that is not won 99.9% of the time. That type of window system is JUNK, They just do not seal tight. With any type of air leakage you will have condensation on the windows. Also check the humidity level, I installed Pella double hung windows in ours a few years back and still had some condensation problems. I found that I had around 70% humidity level, after running a LARGE dehumidifier from work for 2 days I got it down to around 40% and stopped the condensation problem.

As for the sills, I would change them and make a solid wood sill, but if you want to solve the problem first I would look at changing the windows. You will be glad you did!!

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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Yanita
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Tue Feb 22, 2011 9:29 am

Hi,

It is always best to run your exhaust fan while cooking and bathroom vent fans while bathing/showering for at least one hour after each activity. As Greg said window replacement is the best option but not always affordable.

Yanita
The difference between success and failure is who gives up first!

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Lenora_D
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Tue Feb 22, 2011 6:45 pm

Thank you Yanita and Greg for your replies.

Greg, Most of our windows are the conventional, slide up and down kind with a screen on the outside. The master bath and laundry room have windows with a screen on the inside and a 2-section glass set on the outside. You open the windows by operating a crank.

Yanita, I run the exhaust in the kitchen and family bathroom, but the master bath has no vent, probably because it has a window. I know we need to get a vent installed. That would probably make a big difference. Yeah, I think we have too much humidity in here.

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Greg
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Tue Feb 22, 2011 7:24 pm

Are the windows a quality insulated double hung window, or a single pane window?

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."


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Lenora_D
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Tue Feb 22, 2011 7:32 pm

Single pane. I remember that the salesman told us that thick insulation was more important than double pane windows. We were kind of naive and too accepting back then.

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Greg
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Tue Feb 22, 2011 9:38 pm

Very understandable, I think most of us were, I suspect the price was a factor. If you have the 2 single pane window system, they are the basic "Trailer" windows. About the only thing they do a good job of is keeping the rain out.

I would seriously start thinking about doing a window upgrade.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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Brenda (OH)
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Wed Feb 23, 2011 11:00 pm

a short term repair is peel the plastic off
cut strips out of 18 inch good quality peel and stick floor tiles
attach the strip to the sill, staple with air compressor... avoid getting too close to edges of corners and edges.
caulk the edges.

this repair will keep the water from getting back underneath to rot wood... longer term solution is control the humidity, and get better windows.

Brenda (OH)

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Lenora_D
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Sat Feb 26, 2011 11:12 am

Brenda, I did not think of that. Greg, I think I'll look into the price of replacing those 2 crank windows. Even though I'm limited due to the opening size, this house is 17 years old, so it could be that I could find something a lot better now.

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Greg
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Sat Feb 26, 2011 2:28 pm

Are you planning on doing the work, or contracting it out?

Window replacement is not too difficult, It is a little time consuming if you have not done much carpentry work. I would look at going to a slightly larger window than what you have now. The reason being that if you can only find a smaller window you will need to find something to fill the opening you have now. To try to match the siding could be next to impossible. You can always custom order the exact size of the windows that you have now also.

I can send photos of when I did ours if you want.


Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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Lenora_D
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Sat Feb 26, 2011 5:14 pm

Greg photos would be great! Do I private message you my email or how does that work?

Don't know if I want to contract the window replacement or not. I'll have to take it slowly. I know that we're also going to have to replace the front door sill, or facing or whatever you call it, as it is particle board and not looking too good. BUT--that's a subject for anther thread.

stevieb
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Location: Danbury Conn.

Sun Feb 27, 2011 10:02 pm

Here is what I did to repair/help solve the problem. It was easy and pretty cheap. I bought a couple of rolls of that base kitchen cabinet rubber foot/toe stuff. It has a rolled up edge that is suppose to go against the floor. The backing is peel and stick. I sanded all sides of the window frame and cut the rubber to fit the sills. I put the curled up edge along the metal frame and than caulked all 4 sides. I did this all in a dark brown. The sides and top of the frame I painted with good outdoor paint in bown also, Now the condensation stays on the rubber sill and usually evaporates during the day. My neighbor used floor tiles but you will have a seam and the water will go in between. When I take my storms down the sills will be easy to keep clean with a quick wipe.
You have to be kind of agile with the caulking tube but this could be done from the outside with removal of the screens.
I am so happy with the results and the window frames match my outside brown trim.

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