Another Dumb question agaiin from me...

Repair help for the do-it-yourselfer.
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TonyPa
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Sorry, I know I am being a pain. When I went to my MH tonight, to do some more work on it. I cleaned the fireplace out, it was terrbile. Well, after cleaning it. I noticed some of the concrete, had some very slight cracks, in between the brick. is this okay, or should I get some type of mortar and fill them in? I think there is even some type of special mortar for fireplaces?
They obviously were using it a lot. But when I cleaned it out, that bothered me when I saw it. I forgot to grab photos of it. Theres only about three cracks, and there slight. But wanted some advise...
It has some type of aluminum or stainless chimnee. But I just want to be safe.
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JD
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That is basically what you do, but if the cracks are less than 1/8" wide, I would use a grout removal tool to widen the crack. This is a strong metal/diamond blade as shown below. They are real cheap at home stores. This one is from Home Depot.

Image

You do want to use high temp motar made for fireplaces and furnaces. You can't always get it from the home stores and may need a masonry specialty supplier to get it. It is also readily available online. A quick search brought up this.

Sand Hill Wholesale - Furnace Cement

You do want all loose motar and dust to be vacuumed out of the repair area. If it were me, I would run the tile removal tool at an angle in both directions to create an upside down "V". This will ensure that the mortar stays in place.

JMO
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All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.
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TonyPa
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Thanks so much. I will have to dig them out a bit. They are slight cracks, but enough to catch my attention. I appreciate the advise greatly. I will check lowes and home depot. I have to go there tomorrow.
Juice
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That is a huge no-no. Factory built fireplaces are tested as a system. All parts work together but once you change a single piece it's un-tested and you just don't know what it will do. The second you mess with it the manufacturer will wash their hands of it. It is also against any local building code you may have in your area.

It may seem like a small thing and no big deal, but think about this: the manufacturer tests how hot the back wall of their fireplace is during use with their refractory panels and that is how they know how close wood can be inside the chase. Very close in most cases.

The refractory panels from the manufacturer are not the same as refractory cement.

I know it may seem like a pain, and it is, but that is the way it has to be for these types of fireplaces to work. I deal with it almost every day in my line of work.

Juice
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TonyPa
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Oh great. I was thinking just fix the cracks, since they were so slight., and light it up. But I don't want to light up the whole house.
Juice
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I know it goes against the whole purpose of this site, but you really should get it look at by a professional chimney sweep. The cracks may be fine the way they are or the could be bad, and there may be other problems with the system that you weren't able to see.

Go to ncsg.org click on "Homeowner Resources" and put in your info. It will give you a list of the closest chimney sweeps. You can also go to csia.org and do the same.

The price they charge to look at your system is small compared to the price of you house and all your hard work.

Also, I am in WV so I'm not just saying this so you can give me your money haha.

If you have questions about your chimney you can email me. I am installing a stove in my home this summer. HUD is very strict about what goes on inside a mobile home.

Juice[/url]
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Greg
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Well Tony, I think Juice is right, I would have it professionally checked. The LAST thing you need after you rebuild your home is a fire. Nothing saying that the repair has to be made by the person inspecting it, but I would get their opinion on it.

Juice, the purpose of this site is to give the BEST advice possible, sometimes it is to seek the advice of a professional. Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
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TonyPa
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Thanks very much. I truly appreciate it. I am going to have it looked at for sure. Actually I am right off of route 51, you may not be that far from me...LOL
I see they were using it that way, but I won't until I am sure it is safe. It has a stainless type of chimney? I am not sure, but it is a metal chimney coming out of the roof.
DigitalDreams

I'm not suggesting you do it but I have a refractory furnace for melting steel and 5 kilns for firing porcelain, and refractory cement which is made for patching kilns and smelters is actually higher fire than the original cement most manufacturers line their fireplaces with so if you do decide to repair it please contact a place that sells kiln repair cement as this will take in excess of 2100 Degrees of heat and is made to bond in small cracks and other than flat positions as it is a ceramic fiber and silica base concrete.

If that cement doesn't handle the heat you are way beyond the temperature of the steel, and if your fire place is mobile home approved like mine it has a triple wall chimney the inside two walls are stainless and the outer is galvanized.
Juice
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That won't work either. The panels in a factory built fireplace aren't made to withstand heat, they are made to reflect heat away from the box. The whole concept of factory built fireplaces are to keep heat away from the combustible surfaces that are as close as 2in.

These systems are like a washer or oven in that they have a lifespan and do get worn out. They have to be replaced sometimes, from top to bottom.

Juice
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TonyPa
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This one may be factory. I am not sure honestly. I guess photos won't help?
I will have a pro look at it before lighting. But they seemed to keep it someone cleaned up.
I know some came with fireplaces, and then some folks added them. I don't have any info on this one. I wished I did.
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Brenda (OH)
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Tony, please check off topic, I may know what is going on with your dishwasher....

Brenda (OH)
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