Perimeter sag and block skirting

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nmdeskjockey
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Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2013 3:45 pm

Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:27 pm

Hoping I can pick the brains of those more experienced and appreciate any guidance anyone can provide! Apologize for the long winded-post in advance.

I've got a double-wide that's developed a pretty good sag along the long edge of the house in the kitchen where the patio door, sink, dishwasher, and stove are located. I had it re-leveled a couple years ago and then they put up block skirting. Overall, they did a poor job (rural, no other options :( ) and that edge is sagging again. I think whatever they had put in place to support the edge after re-leveling was removed again when they put up the block.

I've seen the perimeter jacks, piers, and outriggers, but since there's cinder block already installed, what are my realistic options to try and prop up/support that edge? I could try to cut some notches for outriggers (best way to accomplish this?), but I'd still need to be able to jack the edge up somehow without being able to get it placed directly underneath the edge, right?

I'm not a very experienced DIY'er and while I've been under the place quite a few times, I'm not intimately familiar with the structure of things. I don't know if my floor joists run parallel or perpendicular. I'm assuming I'd have to cut open the underbelly to find out before I could evaluate if outriggers would even be a plausible option?

Dealing with a sloping floor that I can see and feel is pretty annoying by itself, but I was also wanting to get rid of the cardboard cabinets in the kitchen and get the patio door working properly again. Afraid to put any new weight on it at this point, though.

tldr; Have perimeter sag on the long edge, but have block skirting so not sure how to re-level and support that edge. No idea what I'm doing, so explaining like I'm a 5yo would be greatly appreciated. :D


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Greg
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Wed Oct 18, 2017 7:30 pm

First thing I would do is get under the home with a water level. Take some paper with you and draw a map of the piers. I start in the middle and work your way out. call the first pier zero. then measure the variation in height of the frame at every pier +/- from that zero. mark the height variations of every pier on the map, then you can tell what is what and make any adjustments.

Once the frame is level you can add the required blocking under the parimeter. You should be OK using a 4x4 or 6x6 across 5-6 joists with one pier to support the parimeter.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

nmdeskjockey
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2013 3:45 pm

Thu Oct 19, 2017 7:43 pm

Thank you, Greg, I knew you'd have a brilliant answer! Didn't even think about creating a support point with additional lumber.

I've been reading around this forum for a few years now and I just wanted to tell you and everyone else that still takes the time to participate and share knowledge on this forum after all these years, THANK YOU for all you guys do!

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Greg
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Fri Oct 20, 2017 7:59 pm

You are more than welcome, that's why we are here.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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