New metal roof install

Repair help for the do-it-yourselfer.
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Heathicus
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:49 pm

Mon Sep 25, 2017 6:02 pm

A few weeks back during a storm, we discovered the floor in my daughter's room was wet. In the storm, I investigated the roof and found a soft spot right over the corner. I covered it with some sealant best I could and investigated further the next day. What I discovered just about made me sick. Water had apparently been running under the end of the last shingles for a while and the roofing material under the shingles was just crumbling. I pulled out about a 2ft by 2ft section of the roof by hand. Then, I looked down and saw another soft spot. Same thing there. Then I looked down some more and saw another soft spot. The smallest and least noticeable spot of all, this ended up being about a 14ft long section of the roof where the last 2ft was just crumbling over the kitchen windows.
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The storm had completely passed and it was hot and sunny for several days, so I cleaned it all out and let the sun dry it all up pretty good (covering it back at night to keep critters out). Then I patched with new plywood, roofing felt, and shingles, reinforcing the 2"x2" ceiling joist material where necessary. Fortunately, I didn't find any other such spots on the roof.

We placed the order for the materials for the new metal roof today and it should all be delivered Wednesday. So guess what I'll be doing this weekend. I'll be glad when it's done. We'll be placing 1"x4" lumber strips down on top of the shingles, screwed to the joists. Foam insulation board between them. Perimeter sealed. New flashing. 26 gauge Galvalume metal sheets.

I'll take pictures and document the process for future reference and public criticism!


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Greg
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Mon Sep 25, 2017 7:47 pm

A couple of tips before you start ( I did our's last week end). Keep your help to a minimum, too many people will really screw things up. Three will be plenty, 2 on the roof and one on the ground. Make sure the perlins are lined up and square before you lay down the first piece of steel. If you want an overhang now is the time to do it. You may want to strip the shingles off to reduce the weight on the roof.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

Heathicus
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:49 pm

Mon Oct 02, 2017 10:40 pm

Well, it too us 4 days, but we're finally (almost) finished. I had a crew of 4 - me, my wife, my son, and my 70-year-old father-in-law who worked circles around all of us. If it weren't for him, I would have been lost on a lot of things.

We got started Friday and while putting the edge boards down, we found 4 more spots where the OSB under the shingles had deteriorated from water weeping under the last row of shingles. One of the front corners between the dormer and roof was pretty a pretty bad spot and took some time to repair. Those repairs delayed progress, but fearing there were more spots was why I took off work Friday to get started.

Working around the dormer was slow going at first, but about half way through we got a good process figured out and made better time. It still slowed us down. The heat also slowed us down. We lost the shade over the house at about 10 and by 11:30 each day it was just too hot on the roof and we had to break until about 2 or 3 when we got a little more shade. Today (Monday) was overcast and cool with a nice breeze so we were able to work all day. The only thing left is a few more screws which I can knock out in the morning. We just ran out of daylight and energy today.

So, here's some pictures. First, the hole and repair in the corner of the dormer.
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Part of the fascia board and rafter were completely rotten.
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Rotted sections cut out, new boards scabbed and spliced on.
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I can only attach 3 pictures, so no pictured is the piece of plywood cut to cover the hole then that covered with new roofing felt.

Heathicus
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:49 pm

Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:10 pm

Once the new found water damaged spots on the roof were fixed (total: 8 including all 4 corners of the house), we marked the rafter locations and screwed down slats to the rafters. We left 49" between slats so the foam insulation boards would fit between them.
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The first pieces of tin to go down was the new drip edges. The next pieces were the troughs on the sides of the dormer. There are boards running along under it - two on each side - that can't be seen in the pic.
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A string line helped keep the sheets of tin aligned and set the desired overhang.
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Heathicus
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:49 pm

Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:32 pm

We temporarily set the rake edge in place to help set the first sheet of metal. Then, it was just lay down insulation and screw down sheets of metal until we got to the dormer.
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For small cuts shears work just fine. But for cutting across full sheets, we used an old dull blade installed backwards on a circular saw. It was quick and easy and I was getting pretty good at it by the time we finished the dormer. Our metal supplier recommended the end of each sheet be 5" from the center of the trough, so that's what we did. Then each piece was calked and screwed down to the board under the trough.
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Where there were attic vents, we pulled out the old vent cover, covered the hole with screen, and cut out the insulation above the hole. This still provides venting without having to cut a hole and install a cover in the metal.
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Heathicus
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:49 pm

Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:27 am

Special high temp rubber boots and a lot of metal roofing caulk seals around the plumbing and furnace vents.
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Then the rake edges put in place. A bead of calk where it mates to the metal sheets and a few screws to secure it.
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Then the ridge caps. First on the dormer, then the main peak.
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Heathicus
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:49 pm

Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:31 am

The overlaps in the ridge cap were sealed with two strips of roofing putty caulk stuff. One strip at the end, and one at the first rib line where screws are placed.
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And then done! Now I'm both anxious and nervous for the first rain...
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I skipped a lot of details, so feel free to ask any questions.

stevieb
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Danbury Conn.

Tue Oct 03, 2017 4:08 pm

Awesome job, great pictures. Thanks for sharing!

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Greg
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Location: Weedsport, NY
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Tue Oct 03, 2017 7:13 pm

I found that my steel did go up quick, but I added 160' of 12" eaves with vented sofett & facia on both sides and 6" on the gable end. Working alone on those and the trim has really put the job in low gear.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

yakima4$
Posts: 77
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 11:02 pm

Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:15 pm

Did you install a continuous ridge vent.
Keeps the temperature down inside the roof and helps eleminate condensation problems in the roof cavity.

Heathicus
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:49 pm

Wed Oct 04, 2017 4:44 pm

I'm not sure what you mean by a continuous ridge vent. We didn't make any modifications to the venting of the roof under the shingles. The metal ridge cap overhangs the sheeting by about 10 inches. The space between the metal sheets and the ridge cap is not filled with anything. So there's plenty of venting under the metal roof - up all the ribs and out through the ridge cap along the full length. So I guess that is "continuous"?

One thing I didn't mention and didn't get a picture of was that we bent the top inch or so of the flat part of each sheet up. If the wind was strong enough to blow water up under the ridge cap, that bend should keep it from going over the top of the tin.

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