Order to do outside remodel

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clancaster23
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Thu Mar 07, 2019 8:13 pm

I have a 16'x72' (guesstimate) the wife and I have lived in for over 10 years. We have pretty much redone the complete inside over the years and we want to work on the outside this summer. I would like to put a new metal roof over the existing peaked metal noisy roof that's on it. Would also like to remove the white metal siding, plywood up the sides and get some nice vinyl siding on and to finish it off get some new skirting on as the existing is all broken up and a lot of it is missing from being blown out over the years.

What I'd like to know is what order I should do this in. I'll be doing it all myself. I'm thinking roof needs done first but not sure. See, the existing roof has no overhang. It goes from metal roof and it's attached at the sides and has a small "gutter" along the sides that's only about an inch wide. I want to be able to put a decent overhang at least on the long sides and be able to use real gutters. First, I'm guessing I would have to fasten slats long ways to the rafters of the roof to then fasten the metal roof sheets to the roof. I'm not sure how I do this and have an overhang then be able to attach a gutter on the end. I'm thinking I'd have to possibly remove some of the metal siding and make my own kind of box so I can get a 2"x4" on the end of the roof to attach a gutter to and be able to put some soffit up.

Just wondering if anyone has done anything like this and can give me some tips.


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Greg
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Fri Mar 08, 2019 4:40 pm

Do the outside walls first, You may want to add perimeter blocking to support the extra weight . When you do the roof you can add 12" soffits to it, they will cover the top 4-6" of the outside wall. That is why you do the walls first.

Then put down the purlins, run a line down the length and add shims to the low spots before putting the steel so it sits flat with no waves. I did not do that and I can see waves, but I am looking for it.

Greg
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clancaster23
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Fri Mar 08, 2019 6:12 pm

What do you mean add perimeter blocking for extra weight? Thanks for the reply, very helpful.

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Greg
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Sat Mar 09, 2019 9:10 am

That is blocking under the rim joist to help support the extra weight. If you look at how your home is supported you will see that the frame supports all of the weight through the floor joists. With excessive weight on the roof & walls you can actually bow the floor joists down.

Greg
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clancaster23
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Sat Mar 09, 2019 10:01 am

Any particular way this has to be done or got a link maybe on how the whole process should be done? Is it just stacking cinder blocks from the ground up or is it more in depth?


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Greg
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Sat Mar 09, 2019 8:10 pm

Here is an article on it.

viewtopic.php?t=1067

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

clancaster23
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Sun Mar 10, 2019 5:49 pm

Ok, that's what I thought it would be. I just checked cause I wasn't sure. This one has two steel beams going longways and it looks like they are sitting on two or three blocks and on the bottom of those are square concrete pads. On top of the blocks are pieces of wood/shims. It looks like these are placed about every eight feet or so all the way along the home. Would this be sufficient enough to bear the extra weight of plywood and metal roofing? It has the black sheeting stuff on the bottom of it so I can't even tell where I would be able to stack blocks around the outsides of it

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Greg
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Mon Mar 11, 2019 8:12 am

under the home you should see a 2x at the end of the floor joists, that is a rim joist that is on all four sides. I would stack my blocks and use an 8' 4x4 between the piers to give support between the piers. So you would have a continuous 4x4 around the edge supported by the block piers.

Greg
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clancaster23
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Mon Mar 11, 2019 4:37 pm

Here's a pic of the very back. I see nothing but the steel frame that rests on the blocks and the entire place has a black liner on it that you can see at the top of the picture. If I try to feel up on the edge, I don't feel anything like 2x4's or anything like that. It just feels flat. I really don't want to go cutting the liner.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Y4Om- ... HNym0wAI84

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Greg
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Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:47 pm

On the ends you should be fine without extra blocking, with the frame rails you would have less than 8' between supports.

Greg
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clancaster23
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Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:57 pm

I'm not sure what you mean by frame rails. Like I said, the whole bottom of wrapped so I can't really see anything but the steel frame so I can't see any joists, boards, anything at all. So I'm kind of lost as far as knowing where to put more support at.

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Greg
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Wed Mar 13, 2019 7:02 pm

On the bottom there are two frame rails (I beams) that sit on blocks or piers. They run the length of you home. Above that you will find the belly & wrap (the mesh plastic) above the wrap is the belly insulation that hangs under the floor joists. If you feel the top if the I beam you can feel the bottom of the floor joists.

At the ends of the floor joists under the outside walls you should feel the rim joist that is attached to the end. You can add perimeter blocking under the rim or add a 2x or 4x under the ends of the floor joist to give added support under the outside wall.

The reason you want added support is when extra weight is added to the end of the floor joists the weight is transferred through the joists to the frame. this can cause the joists to bow down and usually can not be repaired.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

clancaster23
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Mon Mar 18, 2019 5:14 pm

Ok, got that figured out. I am assuming 1/2" plywood would be fine for this kind of project as long as I cover it with some sort of wrap? I attached a picture of the existing "gutter" and a look at the roof. I don't think I'll be able to have much of an overhang. The roof itself isn't very steep so I think what I will do is after I remove the aluminum siding and put the plywood up, I'll put on a 2"x4" that will be used to mount the gutter and the only overhang I'll have will be enough to drop into the gutter which I am fine with. Another question is when I put on the plywood, should I use nails or screws? I'm hoping nails, I already have an air framing nailer so I would be able to get it up fairly quick. Put new windows in a few years ago so I'll have to get them loose when the time comes to get the new plywood wall under them but that shouldn't be too bad to do.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1iB5ZT ... wzQt2RZE-s

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Greg
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Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:03 pm

IMG_8777.JPG
IMG_8777.JPG (247.32 KiB) Viewed 343 times
Looks like the standard Mobile home roof (about a 4/12 pitch) . It is easy to add a soffit if you want, I added 12" to ours when I replaced the roof 2 years ago.
All you need to do is build a "box" with rafter extensions and attach it to the side of the home. This will support the steel panels on the top and give you a place to add soffit under it.

For plywood you can use either screws or nails, I prefer screws since you don't have the pounding.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

clancaster23
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Joined: Thu Mar 07, 2019 5:21 pm

Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:15 pm

Very nice, I like how that looks and I think I'll do it. Question, how did you attach the "rafter extensions" to the board that attaches to the side? Screw them from the opposite side of the board? I know you'd put a board on the front of that but want to be certain on how you attached them to the board itself first. Thanks for the help.

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