Stove board ideas for behind woodstove

Come share your ideas for sprucing up your property.

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OklahomaJamie
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 9:18 pm

Sun Sep 19, 2010 4:43 pm

I would love to do something like this in our double wide.

http://www.abercrombieandco.com/images/ ... Deluth.jpg

Do you think it's possible, or do you think the weight would be too much?

Thanks,
Jamie


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JD
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Location: Fresno, CA
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Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:24 pm

You might want to look into Z-Brick, which are basically thin brick facings. There are a lot of products called "thin brick", which are used as veneers on buildings and as pavers for driveways. These other products are 1/2" thick and made of real clay materials. While they are lighter in weight than a full sized brick, they are still much heavier than Z-Brick. Z-Brick is a full mineral product that does not contain plastics or plasters, so it is suitable for a wood stove application. They are made with vermiculite in it, which is a very lightweight fireproofing material. They have 1/2" thick bricks but they also have 7/16" bricks, which of course would be lighter yet.

Easy installation. Can be applied to most any stable surfaces without needing the wire mesh or brown coats the other "thin brick" products require. On paneling, you would need to rough up the surface. I would remove the paneling and put up plywood or OSB to make it more solid and reduce flexing. Just use the Z-Brick Adhesive, which is also serves as the sanded grout/mortar and apply the bricks. They also sell their own sealer if you want to keep the bricks cleaner looking longer. To cut bricks for corners, you scar the brick with a masonry blade and snap it like tile.

I installed a 25' tall, 150' long forklift breezeway for the Z-Brick plant in Washington State when I was in my 20s. The challenge was, this corrugated metal wall was installed on top of an 8' cinder block wall. Very interesting and fun job.

Hope this helps
JD
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All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

OklahomaJamie
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 9:18 pm

Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:44 pm

Thank you very much!!
JD wrote:You might want to look into Z-Brick, which are basically thin brick facings. There are a lot of products called "thin brick", which are used as veneers on buildings and as pavers for driveways. These other products are 1/2" thick and made of real clay materials. While they are lighter in weight than a full sized brick, they are still much heavier than Z-Brick. Z-Brick is a full mineral product that does not contain plastics or plasters, so it is suitable for a wood stove application. They are made with vermiculite in it, which is a very lightweight fireproofing material. They have 1/2" thick bricks but they also have 7/16" bricks, which of course would be lighter yet.

Easy installation. Can be applied to most any stable surfaces without needing the wire mesh or brown coats the other "thin brick" products require. On paneling, you would need to rough up the surface. I would remove the paneling and put up plywood or OSB to make it more solid and reduce flexing. Just use the Z-Brick Adhesive, which is also serves as the sanded grout/mortar and apply the bricks. They also sell their own sealer if you want to keep the bricks cleaner looking longer. To cut bricks for corners, you scar the brick with a masonry blade and snap it like tile.

I installed a 25' tall, 150' long forklift breezeway for the Z-Brick plant in Washington State when I was in my 20s. The challenge was, this corrugated metal wall was installed on top of an 8' cinder block wall. Very interesting and fun job.

Hope this helps
JD

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