Earthquakes and Mfg homes

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paigeroni
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2008 1:21 am
Location: Troutdale, OR

Sat Jan 16, 2010 9:27 pm

In the wake of all the Haiti earthquake news, those of us in the Pacific NW (and I'm sure elsewhere) keep hearing that we're due anytime for the "big" one!

It does make me a little nervous when I think about my home, seemingly balanced on cement blocks like a college student's bookshelf... Is there anything that can be done underneath a double-wide to make it a bit more stable in an earthquake? If so, is it majorly expensive work?

Since mine's a 1993, it obviously survived 2 quakes here before I bought it. But what could happen in the event of a dreadful 5-min long, 9-point earthquake? That's the vision local news stations are entertaining us with these days. 8-\

Thanks! I love this forum. Though I'm mostly a lurker, I've read and learned so much here!

Elise
Troutdale, Ore.


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Greg
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Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:57 am

Hi & welcome. If you stop and think about it, this is one area that the advantage goes to mobile homes, How many stick built homes could survive running down the road at 65 MPH.?? True, you may have an issue with the support piers, but I think over all you would be in good shape. Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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JD
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Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:55 pm

Hi Elise,

There is considerable danger being in a mobile home during a major earthquake. I am not talking about a 9 point. Being close to the epicenter of a 4.5 could be disastrous to a mobile home on standard piers. What can happen is the home can rock enough to tip some the piers. Usually, not all piers will tip, which means as the home finds the ground, some piers can be forced up through the subfloor. The biggest danger is the possibility of the gas line becoming disconnected. Most injuries are caused by people falling or items falling on people.

There are seismic pier systems (earthquake bracing & piers) available for mobile homes. Prices in my area will run just over $2000 to $3000. Here in Fresno, these piers are equipped with concrete pads and used as permanent foundation systems, usually for refinance purposes.

You could try Northwest Mobile Home Supply - (503) 255-5533 in Portland or another mobile home supply house to see what they have to offer.

JMO
JD
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All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

paigeroni
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2008 1:21 am
Location: Troutdale, OR

Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:57 am

Thanks for the replies! Even if I don't splurge on the pier system, that number for the NW Mobile Home Supply will be handy. I've been wondering where to buy things if I need them.

Meanwhile, if we get a big earthquake, I hope I can jump on the bed and ride it out like Dorothy in Kansas. I trust the mfg house roof and structure more than a stick-built.

:)
Elise

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Harry
Posts: 1249
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 7:45 pm
Location: Citrus county Florida

Wed Jan 20, 2010 6:28 pm

Dorthy and her dog Toto.
Aside from the roof leak, soft floors, rats, mice and bursted plumbing ........ how do you like it?

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