1969 mobile home renovation

Repair help for the do-it-yourselfer.
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1987Commodore
Posts: 383
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:53 pm
Location: Steuben County, NY

Sun Dec 02, 2012 9:04 pm

It looks like you could just cut out the damaged area, and cover with baseboards.


Djstorman
Posts: 33
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 1:23 am
Location: Covina, California

Tue Dec 04, 2012 12:14 am

Sounds like a good idea. Appreciate the advice.

Djstorman
Posts: 33
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 1:23 am
Location: Covina, California

Tue Dec 04, 2012 12:47 am

OK so I took some photos of the roof and I have a couple questions

Question #1A/#1B as you can see in the following photo there appears to be 3 "pipes"? that are open to the weather. There appears to have been some sort of housing that had been destroyed over each of them. What are these? I assume they need to be covered so rain wont get in them?
2012-12-03_16-27-12_228.jpg
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Here are close ups of 2 of them
2012-12-03_16-23-15_770.jpg
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2012-12-03_16-23-52_449.jpg
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Last edited by Djstorman on Tue Dec 04, 2012 12:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

Djstorman
Posts: 33
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 1:23 am
Location: Covina, California

Tue Dec 04, 2012 12:51 am

Question #2/#3 Does the roof need to be resealed? I assume it does. How should I go about resealing the roof? What sealent should I use?

Here are some pictures of the roof including some spots I thought might need to be resealed
2012-12-03_16-21-27_447.jpg
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2012-12-03_16-23-30_536.jpg
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2012-12-03_16-21-06_488.jpg
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cattus
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:03 am

Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:09 pm

.
Last edited by cattus on Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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Greg
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Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:21 pm

I would bet that they are plumbing vents. Do they line up with bathrooms & the washer? The originals had small plastic covers over them that usually blow off or get knocked off if you have to shovel the roof in the winter. All I did on ours was add 6" to them they are either 1 1/4 or 1 1/2 ABS pipe. If the seal around it is good you can leave it or buy a new one before you glue the coupler on. I personally don't see a reason to cover them.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

Djstorman
Posts: 33
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 1:23 am
Location: Covina, California

Tue Dec 04, 2012 8:52 pm

They line up with the 2 bathrooms and what I assume is the kitchen sink as we don't have a washer.

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Greg
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Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:03 pm

Both toilets would use a vent stack, Kitchen might. It's possible that there was washer plumbing at one time. It may have gotten covered up,or it may be that the home was made before the check ball type vents and all drains used a stack vent.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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JD
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Wed Dec 05, 2012 1:39 pm

Yes, those are plumbing vents and yes, you need a recoat. That one vent is not lined up very good and it appears that there is extra sealants around the vents that is cracking/alligatoring. I would address the cracking sealant first then install a new vent cap.

There are a couple of ways to do this. One is to remove all sealants down to the metal and start fresh. You would need a strong drill or grinder and a wire brush to grind off the sealants. You will also be running a risk of finding that the original metal is eaten up with rust, causing additional repairs.

A cheaper and safer way to repair area around the vent is to scrub the cracked area real well with a brush and cleaner like Simple Green. Then wipe the area with lacquer thinner to remove residue. Remove the broken plastic caps, clean some more if needed. Then it is best to fill the cracks with a caulk to return the area to a smooth surface. Once that filler has fully cured, top coat the area with several layers of elastomeric sealant of your choice, being sure each layer is fully dry between coats. Then install a new vent cap by putting a big bead of premium roof caulk (I use Vulkem 116 polyurethane tube caulk, butyl rubber caulk works well too) place the ven over the pipe and screw it down with 1" hex head screws. Then use the same caulk to top coat all of those screws, allowing the caulk you add to the top to blend in with the caulk that oozes out from under the vent when you screw it down. The image is the type of vent I use. Galvanized metal and good for over 20 years usually. The aluminum type plumbing vent caps are OK too, but don't buy plastic caps, they are junk.
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PlumbVentCap.JPG
PlumbVentCap.JPG (21.32 KiB) Viewed 4654 times
☯JD♫
Today is PERFECT!

All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

Djstorman
Posts: 33
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 1:23 am
Location: Covina, California

Thu Dec 13, 2012 6:47 pm

Sounds good, yet another project to add to the list.

Djstorman
Posts: 33
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 1:23 am
Location: Covina, California

Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:16 am

Just got Room #1 Done, laid some new insulation and put down the sub-floor.

*Edit* This is before fastening down the flooring.

View #1.jpg
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View #2.jpg
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View #3.jpg
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Last edited by Djstorman on Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

Djstorman
Posts: 33
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 1:23 am
Location: Covina, California

Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:23 am

One more picture and a question:

Picture:
View #4.jpg
View #4.jpg (192.68 KiB) Viewed 4493 times

Question: When I took out the old sub-flooring I cut along the wall. Naturally along 2 edges the old sub floor was under the wall. When I went to put in the new sub-flooring I placed a 2x4 along the floor joist that was flush with the wall and screwed them into the joist so that I could support the sub-flooring on those 2 edges.

When I was screwing in the 2x4's to the existing joists which were flush to the wall, I had a huge issue getting the 3" screws to go in. I even pre-drilled however I would still have screw heads that stripped which may have been because I did not seem to have enough power. I tried multiple screw head attachments of varying size and that was not the issue.

THE QUESTION: What can I do to prevent that from happening?

What drill would you recommend?

I know those are 2 questions.

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Greg
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Tue Jan 29, 2013 6:47 pm

That is a proper way to attach the edges, not that you had a question there.

Stripping the head of the screw is easy to do. You could try a brand of driver bits and predrill the holes when you start to have problems, obviously you drill has enough power or you wouldn't strip the head.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

bobfather99
Posts: 195
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2009 2:09 am
Location: Indiana

Tue Jan 29, 2013 11:16 pm

As for drills, use the best quality/most powerful one you can afford. I have an older Black and Decker I got at a pawnshop for $10. Made in the USA, thats how old it is, lol... For bigger jobs I use my Dads Milwaukee drill from the early 70s. Big and heavy. Looks like a night in jail, but works great.

Great job on the floor!!!
Tip your bartender.....

Steve-WA
Posts: 180
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 11:04 am
Location: Western Washington, Puget Sound

Wed Jan 30, 2013 10:52 am

Lowes carries an outdoor 3" screw - they`re tan colored - that has a star head and comes with a.bit. kinda like Torx. I use the hell out of these outdoor and in

Locked