Emergency heat source?

Repair help for the do-it-yourselfer.
For mobile home parts, click here.

Moderators: Mark, Greg, mhrAJ333, JD

archive
Posts: 1054
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 3:24 pm

Thu Feb 22, 2007 1:56 pm

I totally agree with all posts mentioned above!

We only use our kerosene heater in emergency situations! When it's used, it's placed in a very safe area, and never lit when someone is not' very near. Let's face it! If the power is out and it's 10 below freezing... no one here is far from that heater!

Also remember that a CO detector needs to be replaced every 3 to 5 years... they don't last much longer than that.

Sorry Yanita, yep a generator works great if you have all electric appliances, not so much if you have all gas, and real freezing temps. It doesn't keep a gas furnace going for too long.

In the long run, it doesn't matter whether you use a kerosene heater or a generator for emergency use, both need constant care, and should never be left unattended!

Maureen 8-)


archive
Posts: 1054
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 3:24 pm

Thu Feb 22, 2007 1:56 pm

Hi,

Cold it is!

Just a question...Maureen your post said that a generator would not keep a gas furnace running very long... Why is that...not meaning to be stupid here but I have a healthy respect for electricity and gas and just would like to know why a generator would not keep a gas furnace running. Our generator is of real good size, we bought it when we were at the singlewide totally electric home. The generator would power either the furnace or the AC, although we would have to shut down the water heater. This home has a gas furnace, everything else is electric.

Could you or someone explain to me...definitely need to be prepared in the event of a power outage.

Thanks,

~Yanita~

archive
Posts: 1054
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 3:24 pm

Thu Feb 22, 2007 1:56 pm

Now I may be the one to sound stupid ;-) but... I dont understand using a generator for the furnace without having it professionally hooked into the fuse panel. That is an expense that I can not handle right now. I do have a carbon detector but I did not know that they need replaced so frequently. Mine is about 5 yrs old. I guess I should replace it very soon. My Grandfather died in his sleep due to carbon monoxide. It was from a "warm morning" type heater, if anyone knows what they are. He was feeling sick so slept on the couch which was right next to the heater. It was obviously what had him feeling sick in the first place and then slept right next to the source, never to wake up. I will be replacing my carbon monoxide detector. Thanks for that info, as I was unaware of the need to replace them.

archive
Posts: 1054
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 3:24 pm

Thu Feb 22, 2007 1:57 pm

So sorry to hear of your lose.

While we are on the subject of carbon monoxide replacement, I also make it a point to replace smoke detectors as well, and do not forget to check the fire extinguishers in your home.

~Yanita~

archive
Posts: 1054
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 3:24 pm

Thu Feb 22, 2007 1:57 pm

In my mind, a diesel powered generator will have an easier time running a gas-fired furnace. You're talking about a HUGH difference in demand for voltage to supply heat. A gas furnace runs on something close to a coffee pot, and 110vac. An electric furnace requires 240 volts and a lot of it at that. You're talking about a big difference in the price of the generator, fuel required to run the generator, not to mention the noise factor.
As for vent-free heat, there are ways to calculate how much open air is needed to safely operate one. I haven't noticed any condensation so far. PLUS, newer models have ODS (Oxygen depletion sensors) where they shut off when the Oxygen's too low. The ODS isn't any excuse for a free-for-all on the way one uses emergency heat, but creates a safer environment today -vs- the Dearborn or wall-mounted space heaters of the early to mid-1900's. Of course, houses weren't as tightly constructed then either. I recently added a vent-free fireplace in my home. I LOVE IT! With an added blower, it heats 85% of my home. Thermostatically controlled and propane fuel. I have a GOOD CO2 detector as well.

Just my 2 cents worth.;-)


archive
Posts: 1054
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 3:24 pm

Thu Feb 22, 2007 1:58 pm

Thanks for the clarification.

We do not have a diesel generator but a real big gas generator. Here in Eastern N. Carolina you are more apt to lose power in the summer during hurricane season opposed to winter, although a ice storm has happened.

This home came with a non vented heater in the livingroom. Fired it up during inspection, and another day while furnace was being serviced. But due to personal health reasons I choose not to run it on a regular basis.

Anyways, thanks everyone for your input on this, and as always, whatever you use for emergency heat, heed all operating instructions!

I will lock this topic now. If you have asked a question that has not been answered please start a new thread.

Everyone stay warm, spring is not far away.:-P

~Yanita~

Hey Lane, welcome back...long time no see!:-D

Locked