"Real Windows" instead of interior storm window

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Navarre doublewide
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2009 11:18 am

Fri Jun 22, 2012 12:54 am

Is is do-able to install "real windows" instead of interior storm windows? We have single pane windows and they leak a lot of heating and cooling to the great outdoors. I HATE the look of the interior storm windows most mobile homes have. How do I go about putting in the real windows? I have about 3 and 1/2 (deep) inches from window to edge of wall. What kind do I buy? How do I measure? Where do I buy... assuming it is possible. Thanks for your help in advance...
The truth never lies... JanetGafneaBrown


DCDiva
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Fri Jun 22, 2012 10:30 am

You can buy stock replacement windows from any where are replace your windows. You can order the size you need and add trim to the outside to cover where the whole are for the screws. Or you can change the size of the windows if you do not want to special order. We replaced with low e windows in both of our MH 1973 models and it made a big difference in heat/air.
Here is an album of what we did

http://www.kodakgallery.com/gallery/cre ... s-_-Sharer
Here is my Blog that includes out mobile home remodels--WHich we start again this weekend!!!
http://myprojects-dcdiva.blogspot.com/s ... -results=5

Melissa in WV

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Greg
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Fri Jun 22, 2012 5:00 pm

Plan on reframing all of the window openings to fit a standard "stock" size window. I would always go a little larger than what you have now. The reason is simple, if you go with a smaller window you will need to find something to trim out that matches the siding you now have (good luck) plus you may very well find that the window frames you now have are at least starting to rot.
I replaced all of our's with Pella's a few years ago, PM me if you want with your Email address, and I'll send some pictures.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

Navarre doublewide
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2009 11:18 am

Mon Jun 25, 2012 12:43 pm

Thanks for the reply... Ok so do I HAVE to remove the exterior window?? I was kinda hoping I could just leave the exterior window in place and slide in a real window from the inside, trim it up and
we're good to go. The exterior windows are in excellent shape and the home is a 1997, with no wood rot...I can install "Interior storm windows" using the air pocket between the exterior and interior window for insulation as it were... But I really dont want to pull out the exterior windows. should I just go ahead and use the "interior storm windows" and trim them out with wood? We are getting older and I like to open my windows and the trailer type of window is hard to open. What do yall suggest???
The truth never lies... JanetGafneaBrown

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Greg
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Mon Jun 25, 2012 4:57 pm

It sounds like you have the original "Trailer" windows, Anyone that has ever fought with them will tell you they are junk. If you are in a cold region there is just plain NO way to seal them air tight, you WILL have air leakage.

I truly recommend changing to a quality double hung window, correctly installed they open easy and are 100% sealed. As for no rot, I would bet a paycheck that there IS rot at least starting. Our's was 10 yrs old when I started changing them and the frame in one crumbled in my hands. Do it once, do it right.
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This was one of the better sills.
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This is the new window installed.

Greg
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"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."


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JD
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Mon Jun 25, 2012 7:08 pm

With a 1997 home, it is a good chance that you have some type of lap siding which would cover the nail fins that attaches the window to the wall. Even with wood siding, the factory would probably install the windows and then the siding over the fins. So I can understand your reluctance to pull windows. With older homes, all the screws are accessible and very easy to remove. If the screws are exposed, I would recommend total replacements as Greg and Melissa mentioned. I would order the new windows to fit the existing rough openings though. It is not likely that you would need to reframe all windows due to wood rot.

Just replacing the aluminum windows with vinyl stucco fin windows is a very easy project. Removing siding and/or changing the existing framing is a much bigger task requiring some skills. The standard size "in stock" windows at the home stores will be cheaper but not enough cheaper for me to warrant refaming the walls (unless you want or need to). JMO

If you shop around and let the window people know that you ARE shopping around, you should be able to get a pretty good price. Lowe's and Home Depot also offer a 10% Veteran's discount if you ask for it. I can see the hand writing on the wall there, and I doubt they will keep this discount for long.
☯JD♫
Today is PERFECT!

All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

Navarre doublewide
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2009 11:18 am

Mon Jun 25, 2012 10:37 pm

Wow that is a shocking photo of rot!!! Ok so I will post photos of what I have when we get back home after the 4th of July. We live in gardening zone 8 in Navarre Florida in between Fort Walton Beach FL and Pensacola FL. Heat is the issue not cold... We have vinyl siding with no screws visible around the windows and I a lowly 54 year old female will be doing this basically by my self. I am quite handy with extensive DIY skills.( My favorite Christmas was the year my husband gave me both a table saw and a jig saw :) ) But this window thing has me intimidated. I guess cause I have never seen a window replaced in person. If I see it done once I can do it . So please don't lock the discussion yet. I will post photos after the 4th
Thanks
The truth never lies... JanetGafneaBrown

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Greg
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Tue Jun 26, 2012 4:53 pm

Stop by most any Home center and look at the window displays, most use a mock up wall to show how the window fits in and you can get an idea of what is involved. Ask lots of questions.If you do decide to replace the window, PLAN on spending a day on the first one it is always the toughest and takes the longest. After the first one they go faster as you go, After doing 10 I was down to about an hour and a half.

Since your weather does not have the extremes that we have you may not find the rot issue that I had but be on the look out for it, Like I said do it once.

BTW, being female around here really carries no weight. Many of our family members are female and do a lot of the work on homes, but don't be afraid to ask for help it makes us guys feel better.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

chablis
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Location: New York State

Wed Jul 04, 2012 8:06 am

Actually, I found a local window shop which advertised double-hung low-e vinyl replacement windows of 100 inch size (the sum of height and width) installed for $179. It turned out to be a better price than HD or Lowes. We trimmed out the interiors using colonial molding ourselves, which gives the kitchen a very "stick built" look. The trim cost less than $50 for all four windows.

For the bathroom and dining room, we sourced out windows to the exact size of the openings, also from a local supplier, and were able to reduce the cost to an average of $130 a window. The bathroom window went amazingly fast: My husband had the old window out and the new one in place in less than an hour (sorry, Greg!) Again, we used colonial molding and framed them out on the interiors.

All I'm saying is, don't forget the locally owned places. In most cases, I've gotten building materials from them at less than what the box stores cost.
Chablis

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