More Wall Removal Advice Needed

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bigedschukar
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:56 pm
Location: Hempstead, TX

Wed Feb 15, 2012 1:42 pm

Hey Gang,

Just getting into the remodel process of a 2001 double wide we have purchased. I know this topic is covered A LOT on this forum, but like everyone else I would like "expert" advice on whether or not a wall is a load bearing wall and removeable.

We want to take out a wall/cabinets/fireplace(everything) between the living and kitchen. I know that usually walls in the middle of a double wide should not be mucked with, but this one is off center...about 24" from the middle. We will not ever be moving this home so future transport/roof cave-in is not a concern. SImply don't want a roof cave-in while we're in it!

Here's some pics...

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Thank you for your thoughts, past experiences, and advice!
- Big Ed


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Greg
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Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:41 pm

Ed, from the pictures it's a tough call. The wall is set back a little from the marriage line, but it could still be carrying weight.

You may want to contact the manufacturer and get their thoughts and if you are lucky you may still be able to get the prints.

At the least you could put a couple of support columns in.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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JD
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Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:57 pm

I believe there is a 30' limit to open spans anywhere in a manufactured home. On an older mobile home, everything is usually weaker and could be risky. That interior kitchen wall is also giving some support to the other side of the double wide as well. Even though it is not under trusses on that side, just supporting the other side gives strength to the marriage connection.

I like Greg's idea to design around support pillars. This allows you to open things up and still offer the same support as originally designed.
☯JD♫
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All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

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bigedschukar
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:56 pm
Location: Hempstead, TX

Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:32 am

Thanks for the advice guys! I like the pillar idea as well. We want to put an island there, so I was thinking that a couple of 18"-24" x 18"-24" columns might not be a bad idea esthetically anyways.

I'm going to kick this all around some more and let you know which route I go in a week or so. Thanks again!!
- Big Ed

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Greg S
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Location: Kingston Ontario Canada

Thu Feb 16, 2012 2:11 pm

Based on what you have described and considering the wall runs parallel and off set from the middle it is very unlikely it is a support wall unless roof trusses have been removed above for the venting of the fire place.
I would open it up and assuming there are standard roof trusses above then it is not a support wall.
If compromised due to the chimney or altered in how they run over the wall and attach to center support you may have to repair the trusses but that should not be too difficult to do.

Otherwise I see no reason why that wall would be supporting anything. Remove some paneling and see what you find.
An individual must enforce his own meaning in life and rise above the perceived conformity of the masses. (Anton LaVey)


bobfather99
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Location: Indiana

Thu Feb 16, 2012 3:40 pm

You could always set an island in between two vertical columns, then wrap the columns with wooden trim for good looks value. That keeps the yelling from the kitchen down to a low roar.. :)
Tip your bartender.....

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