Pex lines

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Jaie
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Location: Oswego NY

Tue Mar 29, 2011 1:35 pm

So I have to replace each and every inch of water line in my mobile. I've just spent the winter with no water. (lots of fun) Literally every pipe has come apart etc. I want to replace with PEX (flexible hosing). Replacing the septic is the easiest and it doesn't really need to be done, but since its 20 something years old, I think its a good idea.

But of course, I have questions.

1. Can I use just hosing? I mean is there any reason to have to use ANY rigid piping at all?

2. I planned on mounting the hosing up near the heating ducts using just some plain mounts. Affix to the beams along the sides. Will this work when it freezes? (around here probably in June)

3. If I am not using any rigid lines, can the hosing be attached to water fixtures inside the house? With just the crimps or something else? I have seen shut offs so I am planning on putting them inside for easy access.


Thanks for any help anyone can offer.


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Greg
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Tue Mar 29, 2011 4:42 pm

Jaie, My thought is do it once, do it right. PEX is the way to go, it is semi rigid tubing and very forgiving should it freeze. It is not hard to work with the hardest part is crimping it. Some here have used push lock type connectors but personally I have not had good luck with them.

Lines are run near the heat ducts from the factory to keep them warm. A tight underbelly with no holes & insulation in place.

Most home centers carry PEX & the fittings. Shut offs, you can NEVER have too many!!!

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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Jaie
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Tue Mar 29, 2011 4:50 pm

I was going to invest in the clamps and do it once. I've had non stop water issues here and this year was the last I'll put up with it.

I've handled the hose before, but I've seen where some use a semi rigid line and add it in. What I want to do is run it straight through with the hose, no breaks really except to connect into things. I just want it simple.

This place is pretty much all factory fittings (I've been replacing walls not much else) so I think it is also pretty much a straight shot with the heating ducts. But I am glad to know running near the ducts is the best plan. I was going to then stuff insulation over both to keep it warm in there.

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JD
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Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:38 am

It kind of sounds like you want to bypass the shutoff valves to faucets and toilets. While this can physically be done with common PEx fittings, it certainly is not advisable and I believe shut offs are required by code. I have installed PEx all the way to the faucets while including shut off valves, but that is a pain. I fully trust the use of flexible supply lines for faucets and toilets.

To have a straight run with no fittings in walls, you would have to run a manifold system where each fixture get's dedicated water lines. I think this would be very difficult to do on mobile homes in freeze areas as the manifold would have to be exposed and accessible if it includes shutoff valves. Usually you are looking at putting the main manifold with shut off valves in a utility room that feeds sub manifolds without shutoff valves that service each room with water connections. This still leaves connections in the floor joists at the sub manifolds, so even then you are relying on your connections being sound.
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Jaie
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Wed Mar 30, 2011 12:46 pm

What I had planned on, was going from the main water line, which is in a really weird spot practically dead center under the trailer. I was then going to have a hub directly above mounted to the beam and then run lines to one bathroom (south end near the main) to the kitchen (near north end about 20' from main) and into the master bath. I live on rental property and the landlord has always been less than thrilled about hoses so I had no plans (at the moment) to worry about the outdoor hook up. Although I do plan on running not only that hose hook up but installing a back yard one, they aren't a priority.

Trailers here require no inside shut off. I remember my handyman being really impressed because the kitchen had 1. On the hot water line.

But if I understand what you are suggesting, it is that I run my flexible line then use the rigid line for the interior? Since all the walls in the bathrooms and bedrooms have to replaced anyhow because of pipe explosions, I figure that it will all be replaced anyhow its no more or less work than was already intended.


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JD
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Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:00 pm

Well, some people like to have a hard pipe stub out, which is the little piece of pipe coming out of the floor to the toilet or the little pieces of pipe you see sticking through the bottom of sink cabinets. I usually use just the PEx to the shut offs unless it is a very upscale home.

What I am not understanding is, when you send hot and cold water to a bathroom, you will need at least 3 cold lines and 2 hot, for a toilet, vanity sink and shower/tub. If you are running these in series, pipe to sink, then to toilet, then to shower, let's say, then this would not be a full manifold system and would be just like regular plumbing.

I would not be worried about making connections in walls and floors. I have clamped thousands of PEx fittings and have never heard of one leaking after being tested.

I believe that shut off valves to sinks and toilets are HUD code now.
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Jaie
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Thu Mar 31, 2011 12:15 am

I'm a believer if it runs water out of it, it needs a shut off. I was just going to put the shut offs right into the same lines.

Yes, I realize there are several places the water goes in the bathroom, I figured another hub under the floor of that particular bathroom then send the lines off to the places they need to be might work?

It's not totally about keeping it simple (although I want as few places for problems as possible) But I since is my first PEX install, I'm interested in seeing just how versatile the line is and how simplified it can be. I have a feeling this will be a lot of hit and miss until I figure out what will work and what won't. Since I'm only running lines to one room at a time, I'm hoping to have some room for mistakes.

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Jaie
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Thu Mar 31, 2011 12:54 am

Oh, and I meant to ask, do you have a preference on size hose? Or do you do the 1/2" size down to 3/4" inside the mobile?

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JD
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Fri Apr 01, 2011 1:29 am

Jaie wrote:Yes, I realize there are several places the water goes in the bathroom, I figured another hub under the floor of that particular bathroom then send the lines off to the places they need to be might work?

I'm interested in seeing just how versatile the line is and how simplified it can be.

Since I'm only running lines to one room at a time, I'm hoping to have some room for mistakes.

Oh, and I meant to ask, do you have a preference on size hose? Or do you do the 1/2" size down to 3/4" inside the mobile?
Again, I would not run a manifold system with connections in the floor. That is the room for mistakes thing. Either way, you will have connections under the subfloor. I run PEx much like the existing plumbing.

PEx is supposed to have an inside bend radius that is 6 times the tube size. So 1/2" tube could bend a 3" radius. Pretty flexible stuff. But when you make a 90 degree turn with PEx, use a bend support. They are like clips that support and strengthens the bend. I like the metal ones.

Usually you will have 3/4" tube from the water source to the water heater/cold water T. Most homes are 1/2" from there. Some homes will use 3/4" as trunk lines carrying water to different ends of the home. Either way, it is 1/2" up to the faucets and toilets (shutoffs).
☯JD♫
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All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

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Jaie
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Location: Oswego NY

Fri Apr 01, 2011 3:02 pm

OK, that all sounds about like what I had figured.

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Brenda (OH)
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Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:11 pm

there are straight pipe pex lines that are nice for the part of the line that goes from the diverter up to the shower head... they also are nice if you run out of the coils of pex pipe and just need a last few feet of pex, if your store does not sell any by the foot amounts.

Brenda (OH)

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