Way high up mobile home

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stillworking

Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:48 pm

I don't know how to do links, but there is a photo currently on the USA Today website of a mobile home in the hurricane area. If anybody sees it, I'd be interested in your thoughts on how in the world did they get it up there? They're changing the photos so fast it will probably be gone by tomorrow, but it's really something to see!


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tnt17
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Location: Upstate S.C

Mon Sep 15, 2008 4:09 pm

this it?

Image
[url=http://www.stormpulse.com]Huricane & Thunderstorm Tracker link[/url]

stillworking

Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:27 pm

Nope. It looked like maybe a 16x80 on very high stilts - perhaps 10-12 feet. I couldn't imagine how the home was lifted up on them.

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Demolition
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Location: Arkansas
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Mon Sep 15, 2008 10:16 pm

I think they drive posts deep in the sand. Really deep. Then they just jack it up. Reset the jacks and jack it up some more.
Instead of standard mobile home movers it is more like house movers. When they live on the coast... they expect rises in the ocean tide.
Call Dinwiddie Demolition we'll tear that house right down.
Sweep up every splinter n haul it out of town

garrett_reukauf

Sat Sep 20, 2008 11:33 pm

Down here in TN, there is Pickwick Lake and Dam, it's in southern TN. There are quite a few mobile homes on stilts. Darndest thing I ever saw, LOL! Dang mobile home up on post about 20-25 feet in the air. Makes me proud to a hillbilly. LOL! I did have pics at one time but heck if I can find 'em now.


rdavy

Sun Sep 21, 2008 8:38 am

I have a similar circumstance, I need my home elevated. Anybody ever see how well one of these elevated homes survives a flood? I'd like to have some idea before investing.

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Yanita
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Location: Eastern N. Carolina

Sun Sep 21, 2008 9:25 am

Hi,

Check out the common pics that Mark has posted on the photo album. I believe there a some from homes in Fla.

Here in coastal N.C this is very common. In several areas it is a MUST. We have had some around here set in place by crane. I am sure that is a very costly thing to do, and not something I might consider on an older home. Guess it's a matter of what you need.

There have been many stick builds and mobiles on these elevated piers that have still been lost to coastal flooding, the ground around the piers was washed away from crashing waves.

Seems the homes more inland survived better. I am only to assume this was from surge opposed to crashing waves.

I have noticed that these homes that are really elevated have several steel I beams that run perpendicular to the homes original beams.

I have also noticed that the underneath of these homes are generally left open or "closed in" with lattice panels. I am not sure if this is code or just a cheaper option to close it in.

I would be concerned with a vehicle left idling underneath the home...

For each area I would assume you could get more info from your local codes office, this is not something to DIY for certain. Probably even requires an engineers report.

If anyone finds a link or has further info on this please leave us the link.

Yanita
The difference between success and failure is who gives up first!

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flcruising
Posts: 606
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Location: Florida Panhandle

Sun Sep 21, 2008 12:47 pm

Is this the one?



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[color=blue]Aaron[/color]

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Yanita
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Sun Sep 21, 2008 9:15 pm

Holy #%^#

There is NO WAY you could pay me to live in that! I think I would pay for some dozer work first and then set the home in place!

Yanita
The difference between success and failure is who gives up first!

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flcruising
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Location: Florida Panhandle

Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:41 am

Wow Yanita! I've never seen you so expressive before. :P

I lol'd at your response.

This picture has been circulating around for years in emails, I'm surprised you haven't seen it before now. Usually apart of some 'redneck' list. Like a 'redneck highrise'.
[color=blue]Aaron[/color]

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Demolition
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Location: Arkansas
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Sat Sep 27, 2008 4:30 pm

I wish all the houses were like that... then I wouldn't bump my head on the beams.
Call Dinwiddie Demolition we'll tear that house right down.
Sweep up every splinter n haul it out of town

rdavy

Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:04 pm

I've seen some that look a lot less stable than that but yet they survive these Texas breezes!

Personally I like pipe, oil field casing but I can't say too much since mine is dangerously surrounded by water as we speak LOL.

jusomguy

Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:09 pm

I moved houses untill about four years ago I'll see if I can find some pictures explaining the method of jacking a home up. It is pretty expensive to have pylons put in though.

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Yanita
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Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:17 pm

Hi Jusomguy,

Welcome to the site!

Would really like a set of pics to go with this subject. If you are able to round some up and post would you please start a new thread with it.

I ask only so we can have a nice clean thread with this info. Thanks so much in advance.

Look forward to your future contributions.

Yanita
The difference between success and failure is who gives up first!

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