air nailer????

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mopower440
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 8:59 pm

I am getting ready to do some remodeling on my 2000 oakwood double wide. I want to buy an air nailer to install new door moldings, crown molding, and foot moldings and also to put together a false beam made from 1x6 to cover the marriage line on the ceiling. I am new to using an air nailer and i always thought any old air nailer was capable of shooting ANY type or size nail. After looking at some, i realize that assumption was wrong, you have to get one that shoots the certain nail you want to use. They have some that use 16 gauge, some that shoot 18 guage, some that are for framing nails, etc... so, my question is, which one do i get for this type of work, 16, 18, 22gauge,???Thanks
Craigrrr
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 10:29 am

There is not a one gun/nailer that does it all.
I now have air staplers.Palm nailer, brad nailers, and framing nailer which it shoots 3 different angle of nails up to 3.5 inches long (Harbor freight tool and works great) in my arsenal of air tools.

Only one I do no like to use is my small palm nailer, it works great for framing in very tight spots but the impact it has is worse than having a regular nail gun as it just bangs bang bangs causes a lot of disturbance .

So grab a couple see what you like and build up your arsenal
mopower440
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 8:59 pm

But for doing the crown molding, door molding and shoe moldings and putting together a marriage wall cover made from 1x6, which one would I need, the 16 guage or 18 or 20 guage nailer?
Craigrrr
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 10:29 am

16Ga brad nailer should be fine
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Greg
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Location: Weedsport, NY

16 or 18 ga. Unless you plan on using it a LOT you don't need to go top shelf. I had a Porter cable that I bought about 10 years ago that came apart inside. The parts to fix it came within $20 of a new nailer. I found one at a pawn shop for $25 (a Husky) that works for what I am doing now. Just remember to use the right nails. The Husky is a 16 ga and the porter cable was 18, 18 ga jams the husky up. Air pressure is important too. Too much will damage the nailer and possibly the wood so play with it on scrap before using it.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
mopower440
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 8:59 pm

Greg wrote:16 or 18 ga. Unless you plan on using it a LOT you don't need to go top shelf. I had a Porter cable that I bought about 10 years ago that came apart inside. The parts to fix it came within $20 of a new nailer. I found one at a pawn shop for $25 (a Husky) that works for what I am doing now. Just remember to use the right nails. The Husky is a 16 ga and the porter cable was 18, 18 ga jams the husky up. Air pressure is important too. Too much will damage the nailer and possibly the wood so play with it on scrap before using it.

Greg
Do you recommend one gauge over the other for this job? (16 or 18).. also, will this also be enough to put to together the 1x6's for my fake beam im making to cover the marriage line in the ceiling?
Thanks!!
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Greg
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The lower the Ga#, the heavier the nail. I would probably go with a 16Ga. You can always use some glue when you build it up too. Make sure you handle them in the store and make sure they feel right in your hand and you can handle them with no problem, remember that many times you will be working one handed.
I would also try to find some rough cut wood to build it with and stain it, Just a personal preference of mine. Wood trim gets stained not painted ( just ask my wife).

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
mopower440
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 8:59 pm

Greg wrote:The lower the Ga#, the heavier the nail. I would probably go with a 16Ga. You can always use some glue when you build it up too. Make sure you handle them in the store and make sure they feel right in your hand and you can handle them with no problem, remember that many times you will be working one handed.
I would also try to find some rough cut wood to build it with and stain it, Just a personal preference of mine. Wood trim gets stained not painted ( just ask my wife).

Greg
well, i was going to paint it white because the door, window, and shoe moldings are going to be white..?
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Greg
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I just don't like to hide the natural beauty of wood. Like I said, just a personal preference.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
AbbottsManor
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Location: Abbottstown, Pa

chadomac
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Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:29 pm

AbbottsManor wrote:I have one of these. Works great!
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ryobi-18-Vol ... lsrc=aw.ds
I agree i am using one in our current remodel and can not be happier with it
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Greg
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I have a Ryobi that I bought for the wife, I'm not wild about it. Just doesn't have the power to drive the nails.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
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