what are Tie Down rods for: One purpose only or many?

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waitingtohear
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 2:19 am

Wed Apr 15, 2015 10:46 pm

I've been curious if tie down rods used with foundation post\pier systems such as what ABESCO sells,(EZ-Tie) is strictly for "wind" issues only.

In other words, are tie down rods just to help from having the home being lifted and damaged by high winds or do they play another role such as help during earthquakes? I would assume an earthquake would just jostle the rods below ground level anyhow, which makes me think the rods are really a "wind" resistance helper only.

any knowledge on this topic?


Norm Frechette
Posts: 191
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 7:34 am
Location: Norwich, CT

Thu Apr 16, 2015 4:27 am

the link should answer your question

http://www.nachi.org/manufactured-home-tie-downs.htm

I wouldn't expect tie downs to be that effective in highly sever weather events like tornadoes, hurricanes etc

waitingtohear
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 2:19 am

Thu Apr 16, 2015 7:38 pm

Yes, I read this article before and it talks about using rods for high winds. But, I guess I'm confused what is called a "tie down" for high wind issues compared to the rods that get pushed under ground with a post support like a Abesco Tuf-1, which seems to be for earthquake issues only.

I'm trying to understand if a "tie down rod" is both for high wind usage as well as earthquake securing, or is there different naming for each because all the Googling I've done so far is not making it clear on what type is for what situation.

Mark440
Posts: 238
Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2008 8:33 am
Location: Anna, Tx

Sun May 10, 2015 3:54 pm

This is a bit of a tangent ... but figured it a good "heads up" to any Vets who might be using their VA Loan benny to buy a mobile home. The VA does require the tie downs. But! (there's always a but!) if the purchase is for a home that is already set - then pay attention.

I bought this place a little over 10 years ago. The VA required the tied downs to be cemented into the ground, and the seller contracted to have them installed. I just happened to be out at the property when the contractor showed up. Bear in mind, this place sits on a bit of slope. One end is about 2 feet off the ground. The other end is about 5 feet up.

The contractor - a very, very large man - showed up in overalls with buttons begging to pop, and he had a couple young, skinny kids with him. Said it was his son and a neighbor kid. We talked for a bit...and it just seemed like he was waiting for something. Curious, I decided to hang out for a bit.

He has the kids lug 5 of the 80 lb bags of concrete over onto the deck. He pulls up a section of skirting, gives the kids a couple of claw hammers, and sends them under the house with a couple bags of the concrete and a bucket of water. About 45 minutes later, they were all done. They packed up and left. The bill?? $2100 to the original owner.

All the boys did was scratch a little gulley around the tie downs where they entered the ground - about a foot in diameter. They dumped the dry mix on...through on enough water to wet it...and then moved on.

From the "surface" it does appear the ties are cemented into the ground. But - here's the catch. No inspector is going to take a hammer to the mess to test it. Hence, everybody signed off that all was per requirements. Nothing I said made a difference as I was not the one who ordered the work. The previous owner didn't care as he was fixing to make a boat load of money on the sale.

So, if you have a retro fit for tie downs - stick around and observe that they are being done correctly. If getting under your place is too difficult - get somebody on your side to be your eyes.
Opportunity has a shelf life.

Norm Frechette
Posts: 191
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 7:34 am
Location: Norwich, CT

Mon May 11, 2015 9:29 am

i live in Connecticut and it is required for all new mobile homes to be placed on a concrete slab. mine is on a slab and tie-downs are embedded into the concrete slab.

as an older mobile home is removed from the park, a team comes in and builds a new slab for the new mobile home to sit on. no more homes on dirt

you gotta wonder if your mobile home gets hit by a f5 tornado or monster hurricane, whats the use of having tie downs if all of your possessions are somewhere in the next county?


Mark440
Posts: 238
Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2008 8:33 am
Location: Anna, Tx

Mon May 11, 2015 8:29 pm

Norm Frechette wrote:
you gotta wonder if your mobile home gets hit by a f5 tornado or monster hurricane, whats the use of having tie downs if all of your possessions are somewhere in the next county?
I used to feel my dbl wide was "inadequate" due to tornadoes. But a few years back a little f1 came down near here - and all the stuff that was above the slab on some stick-built houses - was scattered across a couple counties. Yes, all that was left was just the slab.

With the radar technology advances, being warned is now a matter of paying attention ( and NOT being on a satellite connection!). Last time, me and two dogs went barreling down a county road in my pickup away from the projected path. A couple miles down the road....well, it was lined on both sides by all the locals who had done the same thing. Lots of laptops on car hoods watching the radar feeds.
Opportunity has a shelf life.

Steve S.
Posts: 117
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:41 pm
Location: Maine

Tue May 12, 2015 7:53 pm

I have the same cable tie-downs as Norm, embedded in my concrete slab. I did experience a moderate (5.0) earthquake centered in our town several years back with not much damage sustained to my slab or piers. The small cracks I had in the slab simply widened a bit and, of all things, my oil furnace burner electrodes needed to be readjusted. Not sure if the cable ties helped secure the MH to the slab and piers as they vibrated around. Strongest winds I've ever encountered over the past 20 years was about 60-70mph in minor hurricanes and micro-bursts...some skirting panels and siding pulling loose. I'm more worried about uplift of my deck and falling trees during sustained strong winds. Forget tornadoes...if I hear one is nearby, I'm outta here!! Luckily for us New Englanders, they are a rare sight.

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