Dining Room Flooring

Repair help for the do-it-yourselfer.
For mobile home parts, click here.

Moderators: Greg, Mark, mhrAJ333, JD

Steve S.
Posts: 117
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:41 pm
Location: Maine

Fri Jan 24, 2014 12:35 pm

This spring (if it ever arrives this year) I am finally going to replace my dining room floor. The original covering consists of a very thin carpeting and equally thin padding over the particle board subfloor.
I've debated which flooring to use (carpet tile, laminated, or vinyl) for quite awhile...still not sure what to use. I'm leaning towards vinyl planking(floating) at the present...Home Depot has both glue-strip and click-together types. Does anyone have any experience with these products? I've read some good reviews and some horror stories. I may replace the PB subfloor as well... because of the thin carpeting, there are some raised bumps where wet shoes have damaged the particle board :( ...I may be able to sand down those bumps and coat with some sort of sealant.
Thanks for any ideas.
Steve


gtpvette
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:28 pm

Fri Jan 24, 2014 1:03 pm

I was looking at the vinyl planks at Home Depot as well. I opted for laminate wood flooring for the whole place (less the bathrooms). Really like it and it's easy to install. It's been in the living area for 2 years now and is wearing really well. We have two 90lb labs and they don't scratch it up at all ,,,, but they have a tough time with traction though.

Also,,, the laminate I used was 10MM thick which is about 1/2 inch. My take on it is it helps stregthen the floor some,, at least as apposed to vinyl.

Image

User avatar
JD
Site Admin
Posts: 2690
Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 11:57 pm
Location: Fresno, CA
Contact:

Fri Jan 24, 2014 4:26 pm

I have installed quite a bit of the TrafficMASTER Allure Flooring this last couple of years. I highly recommend it. It seems to be a very tough floor covering. Very easy to install. No underlayment necessary. What's with the wrinkles in the underlayment above? Be sure to keep the glue strips clean and only strip them when you are ready to set them. I make all cuts with metal snips. The score and break method leaves a very ragged edge, which kind of messes up the 3/8" gap to walls and such. I like an exact edge. With the 3/8" expansion joint, you need thick trim to cover the cut. I recommend 1/2" corner trim so the floor trim won't look like 1x furring strips. That is subjective though.
☯JD♫
Today is PERFECT!

All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

1987Commodore
Posts: 383
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:53 pm
Location: Steuben County, NY

Fri Jan 24, 2014 6:02 pm

You may be lucky and find that the lumps in the floor are actually the disintegrated padding under the carpet. That is what I found when I did my living room.

User avatar
Greg
Moderator
Posts: 5685
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY
Contact:

Fri Jan 24, 2014 6:59 pm

If spring ever gets here? quit teasing me! I know we have had -22* here, and I'll bet its colder there. I'll take snow over cold any time.

I did laminate in our's and solid Hickory in the cabin I built years ago. I really liked the Hickory, but it was a lot of work to put down.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."


calderhill
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2013 1:37 pm
Location: Oneonta, NY

Fri Jan 24, 2014 7:20 pm

I put down the least expensive(cheap)click together floating floor Home Depot sells, throughout. Some of it has been down 6 months without a problem even where it gets wet near the front door. I posted pictures here awhile back so no sense in duplicating. I guarantee you the horror stories are from people who refused to follow the directions implicitly and did not take their time. The pieces should lock together so you can't tell there's a joint and lay dead flat. If not, try again. If you smash, dent or otherwise abuse the edges of a piece DO NOT attempt to install it. You may be able to use the good part somewhere else. Some of you guys make me feel like I'm in Florida. Only had a couple days where it never went above zero all day. :mrgreen:

Aaronjohn
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2012 8:54 am
Location: Toronto
Contact:

Sat Jan 25, 2014 6:01 am

Choose from a wide range of realistic light wood tones, mid wood tones and dark wood tones to define your living space.
Aaron John
www.247torontolocksmith.com

Steve S.
Posts: 117
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:41 pm
Location: Maine

Sat Jan 25, 2014 8:21 am

Thanks to all for your advice/experience. I really like the look of laminate flooring but it doesn't have the water-resistance of vinyl and is a bit more expensive. I should add that part of my dining room extends to the exterior front door, so that part of the floor sees a bit more traffic and "wetness". I currently have a piece of sheet vinyl in front of the doorway separated from the carpeting by a transition strip. Threshold at front door is leaking some cold air as well, perhaps the PB floor is deteriorated under there.
Glad to hear your vote of confidence on the Allure flooring JD, I'll probably be installing those...I didn't realize the space between floor and walls was 3/8"...I was thinking around 1/8". I have that 3/4"? cove molding...I hope that works to cover the gap.
I envy you guys in CA, although you are suffering too with the drought and wildfires. No one is immune to this wacky weather of late...
Cheers, Steve

User avatar
Greg S
Posts: 541
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:13 am
Location: Kingston Ontario Canada

Sat Jan 25, 2014 10:49 am

My only advice, having experience with all types of flooring instll, is to go with the highest quality (most expensive) flooring you can aford. When it comes to flooring price does matter. You want to put it down once and only once. Cheap will not stand up to ware and water.
For a dining area I would go with a floor that can be refinished such as hardwood (3/4 solid or manufactured) and have some type of water proof flooring at the entrance area.
An individual must enforce his own meaning in life and rise above the perceived conformity of the masses. (Anton LaVey)

AbbottsManor
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Apr 27, 2008 7:12 pm
Location: Abbottstown, Pa

Sat Jan 25, 2014 9:58 pm

I installed Allure flooring in my dining room last November with a Luan subfloor underneath. It as help up well, even against the dog's nails and is easy to clean.

Chris
dining room floor.jpg
dining room floor.jpg (39.21 KiB) Viewed 4831 times

User avatar
JD
Site Admin
Posts: 2690
Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 11:57 pm
Location: Fresno, CA
Contact:

Sun Jan 26, 2014 4:22 pm

trim, 3/4" thick, will work well with any floating floor. With the Allure, you must start at one side of the room, as opposed to tile where you start at a straight line in the middle. It is important to still establish that straight middle line and measure off of it. The first course against the room most likely won't be a full width piece. You have to measure out to be sure you are not going to end up installing a sliver of panels as a last course. Also, I would not count on walls to be straight enough for this work. Also, while putting down the first couple of courses, the plank will slide around all over the place, so there is a lot of adjusting at first. As soon as you have two courses, you can stack unopened boxes of flooring on your work to keep it from moving around as you work.

Yeah, 72 degree high today, but the drought thing is real bad. Snow levels are extremely low and rain is like non-existent. Millions of livelihoods on the line and probably half are already at or below the poverty level. Still we pour huge amounts of lake and delta water into the ocean to protect guppies and to try to reestablish steelhead and salmon fisheries that were killed off with our dams. Guess what California, we still have the dams! Trading the lives of humans for lives of guppies could start an all out uprising here! But it is the law, so it's all good, right?
☯JD♫
Today is PERFECT!

All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

User avatar
Greg
Moderator
Posts: 5685
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY
Contact:

Sun Jan 26, 2014 5:20 pm

Well, JD, If I'm reading you right you can come East, No drought, NO 70* temperature, (-5 right now with the wind chill) and from what I have heard the (ice)fishing is great!

Same political BS here!

And there is always a job for a good MH repairman in my area!

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

Steve S.
Posts: 117
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:41 pm
Location: Maine

Mon Jan 27, 2014 8:07 am

Greg, I'll put up with subzero temperatures and 40" of snow for 4 months rather than a drought any day! Clean available water is more precious than most people realize, and we have plenty of it here in Maine...ask Poland Spring Company.
JD or anyone, how does the Allure flooring hold up to having heavy weight placed on it, i.e. solid oak dining room table legs? The glue-together stuff is only 0.15" thick I believe.

User avatar
JD
Site Admin
Posts: 2690
Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 11:57 pm
Location: Fresno, CA
Contact:

Thu Jan 30, 2014 2:53 pm

Woo hoo! It's raining!

Yes, heavy furniture with 4 legs coming down to those 1 1/4" metal feet will leave a dent. It would on carpet and sheet vinyl as well. If it is a real heavy item like a big couch with a family on it, you might want to use those big carpeted casters. End table and such, probably would not effect it. To be sure, you could replace those steel feet with rubber feet. That way they are not obtrusive and are permanently attached.
☯JD♫
Today is PERFECT!

All information and advice given is for entertainment and informational purposes only. The person doing the work is solely responsible to insure that their work complies with their local building code and OSHA safety regulations.

Steve S.
Posts: 117
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:41 pm
Location: Maine

Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:29 am

Thank you JD...I know the table leaves some pretty good indentations in the carpeting I have now. I was thinking of perhaps using a large round braided rug under the table as well, if the budget allows. I'm still leaning towards the Allure flooring but I probably won't get started on the project until April or May, luckily it's only about 120 sq ft of area...but I may extend it into the kitchen area if I'm really happy with it!
Thanks to you and Greg for your many years of unwavering service to this great website...I've been here since the late 90's back when it was just Mark and Tom Poor moderating. You guys have helped me solve a lot of MH issues and I really value this website...it's one of the best on the internet IMO. I'll do my best rain dance this weekend :wink:

Locked