Concrete Runners

Repair help for the do-it-yourselfer.
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Moderators: Mark, Greg, mhrAJ333, JD

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DIYcouple
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri May 03, 2013 4:25 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Greetings! We're new here. So very excited to have found this site!

We've purchased a double wide from an individual. It is 28' wide by 56' and 4" long. We are located in Oklahoma.

We are doing our own concrete runners. We've searched the internet high and low for plans, et cetera on concrete runners. We've not found much out there as far as a list stating you need, x, y and z to make concrete runners. We don't have a FHA loan or anything like that, but plan to make the concrete runners FHA compliant.

We'll go measure our double wide to see how far apart the straps are and make the runners accordingly. By calling a couple concrete runner contractors for estimates, we've already know the dimensions to make the runners and the quantity, et cetera. We know this isn't rocket science, as far as concrete runners go.

When shopping for hardware for said runners, we know we'll be purchasing swivel head concrete anchors and straps that are 10'. Don't worry. We haven't forgotten about the re-bar, the wood for the frames, and the concrete. Is there anything else we need to purchase or know that maybe we don't know about yet?

I've checked. The only restrictions in our area is that we cannot have any swine. Hahahaha! Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.
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Greg
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Posts: 5696
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY

Hi & welcome. I'm going through the same situation with a 14x80, But I am planning on cement footers & piers. Do yourself a big favor and meet with the codes officer. He can direct you and give you the advice you need to build it so he can approve it.

I am working with a structural Engineer to get our's approved. Remember that soil type plays a big part in the design.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
ponch37300
Posts: 622
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2008 6:12 pm
Location: wisconsin

We live in a park so our runners are provided for us. When I went under to re level the trailer the runners were very poorly done and actually end about 15-20 feet from the end of the trailer and our last few block piers are just on dirt. The runners were cracked and very uneven from freeze/thaw cycles. Footings and piers like Greg mentioned would probably be the way to go to avoid this if you live in a cold area where the ground freezes. I know you said you didn't have any codes or restrictions but if you do have a building inspector that is familiar with what works in the area can be a great resource and usually doesn't cost anything.
DIYcouple
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri May 03, 2013 4:25 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Thanks so much, Greg and ponch37300!
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Greg
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Posts: 5696
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY

The Engineer did a preliminary layout and figured 10 24"dia. footers per side spaced 8' apart. Funny, I had the same design in my head 2 weeks ago. I knew I should have gone to engineering school!!!!

If it were me I would look into a footer system over runners, may save some $$$

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
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Greg S
Posts: 541
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:13 am
Location: Kingston Ontario Canada

Greg do you make your own footers or buy them ready made.
Are you permitted to use 4 X4 pressure treated footers. Two layers played in alternate directions and spiked together.
I am curious as I am setting up a new home this summer and our building code does allow for pressure treated footers on gravel grade.
Our footers are required to be minimum 2' square but one additional foot square is required for every foot in height of the pier over 2 feet.(3 foot pier requires 3' X 3' footer).
An individual must enforce his own meaning in life and rise above the perceived conformity of the masses. (Anton LaVey)
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Greg
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Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY

The code officer requires that the footers be approved by a structural engineer. We are planning on below frostline poured 24" footers with tie downs. Concrete block piers on top of the footers. We have to take into account the soil rating also so we need to do a test bore to find the rating. that could throw the whole plan off. Oh the good old days when you just threw some blocks down and you were good to go.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
ponch37300
Posts: 622
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2008 6:12 pm
Location: wisconsin

Greg, I'm assuming that is 10 footings 8' apart on each beam? For an 80 foot trailer? Should never have to re level that after the initial settling. I don't know why all trailers aren't put on footings like that. Have a post hole digger come in and drill the holes and fill with concrete. Seems as easy as grading for pads and way better in frost zones. Might cost a few more bucks in concrete but without doing the math I wouldn't think much more.
kailor
Posts: 79
Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 11:25 pm
Location: Huntsville, Alabama

What are runners? Foundation walls? Replaces underpinning?
Thanks!
Two 14x66's
countrydan
Posts: 82
Joined: Fri Apr 19, 2013 3:51 pm
Location: s/w michigan

As Greg said I would speak with your county dept/inspector/etc regarding foundation types, etc.. They will be very helpful I would guess as mine were. If that is not helpful I would consult a structural engineer.

Just a note kailor,

As I understand there are multiple types of foundations for our mh's. runners, slabs, individual footings, etc are some different types..
eflyersteve
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Apr 24, 2013 7:16 am

Piers set below the frost line would be very easy - especially in oklahoma where the frost line is pretty shallow. As mentioned above - a post hole digger on a tractor would make short work of it along with tube forms from HD or Lowes. We hand dug our piers and poured them ourselves over a few weeks of evening work. Then moved the home in, leveled and then dug for a paremiter 'stem wall' of sorts - this was done after moving in so that it could be exactly where needed and didn't rely on someone getting the mobile home perfectly aligned. This wall also extends below the frost line and above the ground by about 4" and is capped with pressure treated 2x4 to attach the bottom of the skirting.

If using piers, be sure that the movers are good - ours clipped the edge of one pier with a wheel of the house and it actually pushed it over a bit. Seems they all can support the house together but one individual pier isn't quite enough to take that much load. It might have survived in a norther state where the frost line, and therefore the pier, was set much deeper.
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Greg
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Posts: 5696
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm
Location: Weedsport, NY

kailor wrote:What are runners? Foundation walls? Replaces underpinning?
Runners are usually a continuous poured "Footer" running the length of the home, one under each beam. To be a proper footer they would need to be below the frost line. In my case that would be around 48". Now if I am going to pour 2 4' deep x 1 1/2' wide x 80' long runners that a LOT of concrete. I think a full pad would cost less.

Foundation walls would be a parameter wall, again it should be below frostline. you could pour a footer and use blocks from the footer to rim joist. You would still need a support system for the frame.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."
kailor
Posts: 79
Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 11:25 pm
Location: Huntsville, Alabama

I should clarify my post. I did not know what was meant by a runner. I know what foundations are footers are but just did not know what was being referred to when the term runner was used. Being from the south and I don't know if that has anything to do with it, I've never heard the term runner when talking about mobile homes. Anyway, the load of the home should be evenly dispersed to the ground by piers or runners at a depth which is below the frost line for your area of the country. Generally speaking, the width of the runner is equal to half of the runner's depth.
Thanks!
Two 14x66's
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