blow-in insulation

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betty
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 8:03 pm

Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:05 pm

Is blow-in insulation worth the price of putting it in the whole exterior (in the walls, floor & roof)? As some may have read from my posts I'm having alot of heating bill issues & keeping it warm- my heater runs every 15 mints & well the bill for propane is up to about $450 or more a month & thats only on 67 degrees, which is cold for me :( ... SO my floor is always cold... is this a WISE & money well spent purchase? IF SO, whats the best & longest lasting insulation? How long will this last? DO I have to use different types for the walls vs roof vs floor? I read somewhere to use polystyrene beads for the ceiling but cellulose for the floor?? I thought cellulose was heavy, will it not pull down on my belly board?
ANY suggestions PLEASE send them my way, thank you!


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Greg
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Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:59 pm

Personally I would not have much of a problem blowing in the ceiling and possibly the belly, but I don't think I would do the walls. Any time you open up a cavity that has blown in you have a big mess. Now you don't often need to open up the ceiling. The walls seem to need to get opened up more than anything else and the belly needs to get opened up for any duct work or plumbing. I would stay with fiberglass in the walls.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

betty
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 8:03 pm

Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:29 pm

what type of blow-in would you recommend for the ceiling & the belly? what will last the longest? Is it better to just redo &/or add more regular insulation to all 3 instead of the blow-in? I'm trying to make whatever I do last along time but I need something thats going to make it alot warmer in my home; I thought the blow-in would be alot warmer & last longer based on reviews I've read.

1987Commodore
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Location: Steuben County, NY

Wed Feb 13, 2013 11:10 pm

When Weatherization visited us, they indicated they would not do blown in in a mobile home's walls, because the wall panels would likely be collapse inward, since most are held only with staples.

betty
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 8:03 pm

Fri Feb 15, 2013 4:17 pm

OK, I never thought about the paneling only being held on by staples & if they are arguing that point, then it can be said not to use it for the belly either bc of the same reason & if theres not 2 layers of insulation in my ceiling/roof then it cant be used there either.... OK THEN!! What now??
What about this stuff, spray-in foam (not the stuff in the can thats yellow) theres spray-in foam that you use for insulating?? Any suggestions with this? I'm guessing its probably highly expensive & it looks like its not very respiratory healthy (dont know about after it dries??)
Is standard insulation my only option then?? Its just such a mess putting in & I'm not soo sure it lasts very long without decompressing! Any suggestions would help, thanks


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Greg
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Fri Feb 15, 2013 5:24 pm

I would recommend an energy audit. They will come in for free and give you recommend repairs and upgrades based on what they see. They should be able to answer your questions on what is best in your case. In many cases they will help answer questions about the financial end as well and in many cases help secure any grants available.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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Greg S
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Location: Kingston Ontario Canada

Sun Feb 17, 2013 7:16 pm

The problem with adding insulation is it is neither easy or inexpensive. Some in our community have had spray foam insulation applied under their homes to the skirting. The cost was about $1000 and all say they have warmer floors.
Adding spray foam to existing walls would require the removal of all wall boards and existing insulation prior to spraying between studs. Likely cost prohibitive.
I have added rigid insulation to the exterior of homes when residing with vinyl but this is also labour intensive and on a single wide was about $2200 for material (siding and insulation).You could likely double that cost if hiring contractors. This is the most practical approach and reduces heating costs as well as improves upon both value and appearance of the home.

Unless you are already planning a whole house renovation project adding insulation to the interior of a mobile home is not practical unless the home is of considerable value. Although moving may not be practical it should be considered as a option in your future plans.
An individual must enforce his own meaning in life and rise above the perceived conformity of the masses. (Anton LaVey)

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