New single-wide questions

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satter
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Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 5:57 pm

Fri Aug 10, 2012 12:11 pm

Hi all,

My wife and I previously lived in an older single-wide, and eventually sold it, and bought a house closer to town. We're now considering putting the house up for sale, and moving back to our old property, where the trailer used to sit... with one option being possibly buying a newer, nicer single-wide.

I had a few questions running through my head that I thought I'd float out here for people who'd likely have answers. :)

1) Our old trailer was sitting on a full 14x70 concrete slab that we had poured. If we bought a newer one, say 16x80, what's the best plan of attack for the foundation? Would a 16x80 sit ok on the 14x70 pad, as far as where the crucial points of contact would likely be? Or would I need to consider extending out the pad in some way? Or am I thinking completely wrong here?

2) We've looked at a lot of double-wides and modulars at sales lots, since we've been thinking of moving back, but not really any single-wides. We're considering maybe going the single-wide route though, so, my question is... are most double-wide manufacturer upgrades available on single-wides also? I'd like to possibly get a new one with sheetrock/drywall, upgraded insulation, windows, etc, if those are typically available.

Thanks for any info! I appreciate it.
-Ryan


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Greg
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Fri Aug 10, 2012 6:37 pm

First, the pad. I would make the pad the same size as the home if not bigger. Both for support and moisture control, this may also be a code requirement.

Options/upgrades. Usually the list is huge. You should sit down with a few dealers and get their thoughts on what is available and what can be built to YOUR specifications. Feel free to post more questions on options if you want. I know they can get confusing, get as much information as possible. Write things down also. At the very least window & insulation upgrades, there may be floor joist & rafter/roof upgrades also.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

satter
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 5:57 pm

Fri Aug 10, 2012 7:09 pm

Thanks, Greg.

We stopped at a nearby dealer lot that sells MHE brand homes, and they had one single-wide that we really liked.

Here's the link to what comes standard on this particular series of home... does anything jump out at you on this list as a pro or a con... also any suggestions for what to see about upgrading?

http://www.mheinc.com/index_htm_files/M ... tional.pdf

If we go this route, we're going to get sheetrock drywall installed from the factory, and perhaps a few other upgrades.

Thanks again,
Ryan

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Greg
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Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:11 pm

A few things that I did notice was the 60" (full size) bath tubs rather than the standard 54" mobile home tubs. I would try to increase from the 100 amp electric service. In this day of electronic everything I just don't feel it is enough I would go for at least 150 if not 200.

Stay with OSB subfloor unless you can get plywood. Partical board floors are JUNK, trouble just waiting to happen.

Since it's not my money, I would check on Kitchen cabinet upgrades. Most standard cabinets are Partical board. Again, junk when they get wet. They look good for a year or two then go downhill fast.

Make sure the roof weight rating is at least the minimum rating for your area.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

satter
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 5:57 pm

Sat Aug 11, 2012 6:52 pm

Thanks, again for the input. The cabinets in this series are actually solid wood cabinets, with backs, and the whole 9-yards, so I think we're good there. I'd concurred with you on the issue of 200 amp service... it's not that much to go ahead and upgrade that.

Appreciate it!

-Ryan


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Greg S
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Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:13 am
Location: Kingston Ontario Canada

Thu Aug 16, 2012 10:06 am

I personally would strongly advise against extending the existing concrete slab. The width of the old may be OK but it is far too short. The problem with adding 10' on to a existing slab is that the new slab will never float the same as the old and you will end up with piers shifting differently on the new as opposed to the old slab. This will cause a twist or bend in the home. Better to go with a complete new slab on a new footprint where the entire slab will float as a single unit. Stay away from the old pad location as again placing a larger pad will likely result in a break in the slab between the old and new soil section.
An individual must enforce his own meaning in life and rise above the perceived conformity of the masses. (Anton LaVey)

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Greg
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Thu Aug 16, 2012 5:36 pm

Good point about adding to the existing pad, but if you do not have a ground freeze issue you should be OK. I would talk to who ever does the concrete work and get their thoughts as well.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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