Sediment in water supply lines

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Steve S.
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:41 pm
Location: Maine

Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:01 am

Hi All,

After flushing and recharging my pressure tank recently, I have had problems with sediment in the cold water lines plugging up fixtures and reduced water pressure. Anyone have any ideas on how to quickly flush all the sediment from the entire cold water system? I have had this problem before during power outages and the pressure tank empties completely...over time the sediment is slowly removed after repeated cleanings of faucet screens. I have thought of using the hot water line at the spigot in the utility room to backflush through the cold water line and out through the outside hose bibb...if I keep all the other fixtures turned off, it should flush most of the sediment outside, or hopelessly clog all the fixtures again. Ideas???


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Greg
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Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:18 am

I don't think there is a quick way other than removing the screens and flushing the system. You may want to think about a whole house filter system to prevent or reduce the problem. They are simple to install.

Greg

http://www.acehardware.com/product/inde ... 1386643684
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

Steve S.
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:41 pm
Location: Maine

Fri Apr 01, 2011 11:29 am

Hi Greg,
Yes, I suppose I'll just have to be patient and let the sediment slowly work its way out. Where is the filter usually placed...before or after pressure tank, main shut-off valve? I'd like to keep the sediment out of the tank as well, however there's not much room to work there before the riser comes through the floor.

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Greg
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Fri Apr 01, 2011 11:44 am

You can put the filter anywhere, but to protect the tank you would need to install it before the tank. You could install 2 filters, one before the tank & one after the tank, that way if the first goes into bypass mode the rest of the system would be protected.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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flcruising
Posts: 606
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 2:18 pm
Location: Florida Panhandle

Mon Apr 04, 2011 8:08 pm

FYI - I tried installing a water filtering system before the pressure tank once and the pump short cycled constantly because of the restriction caused by the filter. If you install before your main pressure tank, you may have to add a smaller pre-pressure tank to dampen the surge when the pump initially turns on. But then again, maybe a lower restriction sediment filter won't cause that issue.
[color=blue]Aaron[/color]


Steve S.
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:41 pm
Location: Maine

Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:45 am

Indeed...in my case, installing a filter seems to be more trouble than it is worth. I managed to flush most of the sediment out through the outside hose bibb just by running the water at full tilt for about 5-10 pump cycles...along with multiple cleanings of all the faucet cartridges and screens, and toilet fill valve. Also drained the water heater just for good measure. I just have to be very careful not to turn on the house main valve BEFORE all the sediment is removed from my pressure tank. A lot of the "sediment" appears to be rust particles probably from the galvanized tee which links the riser to the pressure tank and the main water line.
Cheers, Steve

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