Should skirting hang over edge of slab?

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mdnagel
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Fri Nov 03, 2017 5:07 am

WOW, hard to believe that it's been six years since I was first inquiring about this (viewtopic.php?p=46049#p46049)!

Many projects have kept me away from doing repairs on the home. Now that they're finished I'll be, finally, getting around to the home, but only come Spring of 2018.

As had been mentioned in that post of mine linked above, my home sits on a concrete slab. The skirting on the ends of the home extend to and past the edges of the slab (but basically not below). On the front and back, however, the slab extends a good 4 inches (or six). I don't believe that this is proper: I know that for stick-built homes/buildings that the sill plates will come to the edge of the slab and the siding will then overlap such that it hangs past and down the slab; this allows any water to escape down and outside the slab. Am I wrong in thinking that this same construction principle should be used with manufactured/mobile homes as well?

While I may install Hardi-Plank, which would be impervious to water, I'd still like to do things right if I'm tearing things apart. I figure that I could just run a concrete saw to trim off that extra width of slab (there's nothing depending on it other than a couple posts my front deck is setting on- the deck will be completely replaced, so no concerns there).


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Greg
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Fri Nov 03, 2017 5:27 pm

There really is no cut and dry way to install the bottom as long as it is sealed up. The cleanest looking would be to set the track on the concrete.
You have to remember that when the pad was poured they did not have the exact measurements plus the mover would have to do an perfect placement of the home when it was set up.

Greg
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mdnagel
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Sat Nov 04, 2017 6:20 am

Hi, Greg!

No tracks, just pressure treated wood framing for attaching the T1-11 skirting. The sealer along the bottom has long since departed.

Haven't looked at this in quite a while. I seem to recall that they had attached the skirt frame to the home, which I thought wasn't correct?

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Greg
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Sat Nov 04, 2017 6:53 am

Again, if you ask 10 people you will get 10 answers. Here is one manufacturer's instructions
https://www.skirtingdirect.com/pdf/viny ... ctions.pdf

I used insulated concrete roof panels on our's so it was a "wing it as you go" job.
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=10629&p=55511&hilit ... ing#p55511

The final goal is something that looks good and keeps weather & critters out.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

mdnagel
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Sun Nov 05, 2017 12:53 am

OK, thanks for the input. I'll do some more pondering. But...

Is it correct that the skirting should be free floating, not attached to the home itself? (reason for the tracks [upper]?) As mentioned, I have some framing for the skirting and (I believe) they connected it to the rim joist. The skirting (T1-11) is then screwed to this frame. The top edge of the skirting comes under a trim piece; no flashing. The trim piece (ugh, someone installed it with the wrong nails- bleeding rust!) needs to go.

I need to take and post a picture.


mdnagel
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Sun Nov 05, 2017 1:40 am

Question on your skirting

Image

What is that darker band of material delineating? Why wasn't the lighter material above run down to the top edge of the skirting)?

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Greg
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Sun Nov 05, 2017 10:19 am

In most applications there should be a top rail to allow for ground or home movement during the freezing weather.
I decided to try a shallow track (metal 2x4) screwed to the bottom of the rim joist when I did ours. The home is set on 18" piers 48" deep so frost is not going to move the home.
I think the band you are seeing in the picture is a 2x that I used to align & support the steel skirting. The concrete shirting is in the ground a minimum of 6-8". I replaced the 8" white trim with a grey trim after I finished the skirting.

Greg
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mdnagel
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Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:24 am

Greg, I really like what you did. I can't seem to find those panels around anywhere. How do/did you facilitate access "doors?"

Here's a picture that kind of shows the situation I have, the extra width on the slab, and the skirting framing (note top is attached directly to home):
Skirting.jpg
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Greg
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Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:09 pm

Those were insulated concrete panels that same off of a commercial building that were used to protect a rubber roof.
For the access panel I cut the access hole in the panel and framed it with pressure treated wood.
In most cases the top of the skirting should be allowed to float. If you are in a region that does not freeze you may be fine with solid mount.

Greg
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mdnagel
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Wed Nov 08, 2017 7:30 am

Not exactly freeze-free here- PNW.

Being on a slab would it really matter? I'm trying to get my head around all the possible dynamics: I can understand non-slab and non-pier installations being sensitive to freezing.

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Greg
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Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:24 pm

On a slab you should be OK as long as the slab was installed correctly. I have seen cases of poor installations where the whole slab shifted and cracked.

Greg
"If I can't fix it, I can screw it up so bad no one else can either."

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